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Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park [CA]

Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park secures for the people and makes available for their observation, inspiration, and enjoyment, the gold discovery site and its environs as an accurate portrayal of the story that unfolded at the time of the discovery and Gold Rush. The park's interpretive program primarily embraces the period from 1847 through 1852, but also shows the town of Coloma as it developed. Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park is the place where James W. Marshall found flecks of gold in the tailrace of the sawmill he was building for himself and John Sutter. This discovery in 1848 changed the course of California's and the nation's history. Visitors can see a replica of the original sawmill and over 20 historic buildings including mining, house, school, and store exhibits. Visitors have the opportunity to try panning for gold in the American River and enjoy hikes and picnics under the riparian oak woodlands. Overlooking the river canyon, where the gold discoverer rests today, visitors ca see California's first historic monument, the statue of James Marshall pointing at his gold discovery site .

The park offers exhibits, tours, educational programs, living history events, and other recreational and educational events.

 
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