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Jémez State Monument [NM]

The Jemez State Monument Heritage Area includes the stone ruins of a 500-year-old Indian village and the San José de los Jemez church dating to 1610. The village of Giusewa was built in the narrow San Diego Canyon by the ancestors of the present-day people of Jemez (walatowa) Pueblo. The name Giusewa refers to the natural springs in the area. In the 17th century, the Spanish established a Catholic mission at the village. The mission was short-lived, and, in time, the people abandoned the site and moved to the current location of Jemez Pueblo. The massive stone walls were constructed about the same time the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Rock. The heritage center contains exhibitions that tell the story of the site through the words of the Jemez people. A 1,400-foot interpretive trail winds through the impressive site ruins.

The site offers exhibits.

 
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