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Past Rebel Lines

Jan 10 2011
Instructions
Print, Benedict Arnold, 1741-1801, c.1894, Library of Congress

Think spies and the American Revolution, and what comes to mind? Likely Benedict Arnold, a name synonymous with treason in American popular memory—but Revolutionary-era spying didn't begin or end with Arnold. Decide whether the following statements about spies in the Revolution are true or false.

  1. Only Patriots knew how to create effective invisible ink, allowing them to write concealed messages that only the letters' recipients knew how to reveal.

    True

    False

  2. Spies concealed sensitive letters in quills, canteens, buttons, bullets, and other small objects.

    True

    False

  3. Patriots do not seem to have known how to create or read masked (or Cardan) letters—letters that could be read only when a special template was placed over the text.

    True

    False

  4. Spies did not use codenames in correspondence during the American Revolution. They wrote names out in full, gave them as initials, or left them out entirely.

    True

    False