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Women in the Lab (and the Field)

May 16 2011
Instructions
Photo, Science class in Georgetown Visitation Prep[…] Library of Congress

Polish-born French physicist and chemist Marie Curie won two Nobel Prizes for her work with radioactivity. British primatologist Jane Goodall is famous for her work with chimpanzees. British scientist Rosalind Franklin contributed to the discovery of DNA's structure. You might know their names, but do you know the names of these American women scientists?


  1. Rachel Carson, the author of Silent Spring, was a:
    A.

    Marine biologist

    B.

    Chemist

    C.

    Botanist

    D.

    Mineralogist


  2. Grace Hopper, instrumental in the creation of COBOL, was a:
    A.

    Computer scientist

    B.

    Physicist

    C.

    Mathematician

    D.

    Linguist


  3. Barbara McClintock, 1983 Nobel Prize winner, earned her degrees in:
    A.

    Genetics

    B.

    Chemistry

    C.

    Botany

    D.

    Physical cosmology


  4. Mae Jemison, a physician with a background in chemical engineering, is also a(n):
    A.

    Entomologist

    B.

    Astronomer

    C.

    Astronaut

    D.

    Seismologist