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Lewis Hine: Caption Critique

Nov 28 2011
Instructions

A picture is worth a thousand words, right? Consider these photographs taken by Lewis Hine (1874–1940), known for his use of photography to advocate for child labor laws and other social reforms. On its own, each photograph is a picture, without context. Who are the people in the photos? What are their lives like? What are they doing? Why did Hine choose to photograph them?

Look at each photograph, and then choose the caption Hine wrote to accompany it.


  1. A.

    "A break from play"

    B.

    "Ice cream is a novelty in the city"

    C.

    "The best thing for a hot day"

    D.

    "Where the newsboy's money goes"


  2. A.

    "Bringing in the fall harvest in good company"

    B.

    "Boys salvage family goods from a wagon accident"

    C.

    "The filth of Fall River, Massachusetts"

    D.

    "Pine Street dump scavenger"


  3. A.

    "Children at Muskogee Glass. Workers of all ages allowed regular breaks, especially when weather is fine (Ellis report)."

    B.

    "Muskogee Primary subscribes to the belief that youth benefit from unstructured physical exertion (Ellis report). Children play for 10 m. on the hour."

    C.

    "Children play in an abandoned park in the tenement district. Playing equipment was unsafe, on the edge of collapse, w. sharp edges abounding."

    D.

    "Play-time at the Oklahoma School for the Blind. Children have a great deal of freedom (Ellis report). Photos were not posed."


  4. A.

    "The elder John Paulk proudly shows off his youngest's newest pet. The Paulks are a prosperous family in the region."

    B.

    "John Paulk is known in the region as a local eccentric. He collects livestock marked for slaughter and maintains a 'riding park' for children."

    C.

    "South Georgia farmer poses with State Fair grand prize yearling. John Paulk family."

    D.

    "2 'yearlings' belonging to a South Georgia farmer. The former usually gets more attention than the child. John Paulk family."