Teaching Materials
Ask a Master Teacher
Lesson Plan Gateway
Lesson Plan Reviews
State Standards
Teaching Guides
Digital Classroom
Ask a Digital Historian
Tech for Teachers
Beyond the Chalkboard
History Content
Ask a Historian
Beyond the Textbook
History Content Gateway
History in Multimedia
Museums and Historic Sites
National Resources
Quiz
Website Reviews
Issues and Research
Report on the State of History Education
Research Briefs
Roundtables
Best Practices
Examples of Historical Thinking
Teaching in Action
Teaching with Textbooks
Using Primary Sources
TAH Projects
Lessons Learned
Project Directors Conference
Project Spotlight
TAH Projects
About
Staff
Partners
Technical Working Group
Research Advisors
Teacher Representatives
Privacy
Quiz Rules
Blog
Outreach
Teaching History.org logo and contact info

History Education News - Volume Three



Download Subscribe

ISSUE
JAN
teachinghistory.ORG
HISTORY EDUCATION NEWS
HISTORY CONTENT 3
BEST PRACTICES 6
TEACHING MATERIALS 8
ISSUES AND RESEARCH 10
TAH GRANTS 12
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 14
03 2009
featuring
Material Culture
History Education News | teachinghistory.org
HISTORY EDUCATION
NEWS
National History Education Clearinghouse 4400 University Drive, MSN 1E7 Fairfax, VA 22030
Toll Free: 866.539.8381 info@teachinghistory.org teachinghistory.org
STAFF
Sam Wineburg, Executive Producer and Senior Scholar Sharon Leon, Co-Director Daisy Martin, Co-Director Kelly Schrum, Co-Director
Teresa DeFlitch, Project Manager Lee Ann Ghajar, Project Manager Jane Heckley Kon, Project Associate Laura Veprek, Lead Web Designer Ammon Shepherd, Webmaster
Jon Lesser, Lead Programmer Lara Marie Harmon, Research Associate Brad Fogo, Research Assistant Jack Schneider, Research Assistant Eric Shed, Research Assistant Mark Smith, Research Assistant Robert Lucas, Research Assistant
Cover image: Making harnesses, Mary Saverick stitching, Pioneer Parachute Company Mills, Manchester, CT, c. 1942, Library of Congress: LC-USW36-280
ABOUT
The National History Education Clearinghouse (NHEC) was created to help K-12 teachers access resources and materials to improve U.S. history education in the classroom. NHEC is funded by the U.S. Department of Education Office of Innovation and Improvement’s Teaching American History (TAH) program under contract number ED-07-CO-0088. It builds on and disseminates the valuable lessons learned by more than 800 TAH proj- ects designed to raise student achievement by improving teachers’ knowledge and understanding of traditional U.S. history. The content of this publication does not necessarily
reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Education nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
© 2009 Center for History and New Media
Created by the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University and the Stanford University History Education Group, in partnership with the American Historical Association and the National History Center.
OBJECT LESSONS
History is not just about words. Teacups, houses, bedsteads, toys, paintings, clothing, and thousands of other objects provide insight into the past. Commonly referred to as mate- rial culture, these objects provide a fascinating way for students of all ages to sharpen their ability to think like a historian. Furthermore, study- ing objects and other types of visual evidence opens up exciting new fields in history to students, from historic preservation and archaeology to work in museums and historical
societies. In this issue of History Edu- cation News, we highlight just a few of the many resources that feature material culture and encourage you to visit teachinghistory.org to explore these and other resources that will help you teach with objects.
The National History Education Clearinghouse has plenty of valuable resources to help you engage and challenge your students. Along with History Education News, the Clearing- house at teachinghistory.org is a free resource. Visit today and let us know what you think!
History Content
“Biographies of things can make salient what otherwise might remain obscure.” —Igor Kopytoff
The Internet offers unprecedented op- portunities to explore material culture. Many websites provide direct access to exhibitions and collections, giving educators and students access to mu- seums all over the country or a special collection that is not usually on display. At teachinghistory.org you can search for online archives. In addition, many of these resources have special sections for teachers that include lesson plans, interactive activities, or teaching guides.
WEBSITE REVIEWS
DIGITAL VAULTS
digitalvaults.org
This interactive website from the National Archives presents more than 1,200 items, including official documents, personal accounts, images, maps, and ephemera. Browsing is easy from the main page which presents a rotating
cast of eight archival items, such as an early engraving of the Declaration of Independence, a top secret document on dropping the atomic bomb, and an image of Navajo code talkers. Each item
is accompanied by a brief annotation providing historical context and related tags, further facilitating browsing. All items can be zoomed for highly detailed viewing and rendered printer-friendly for classrooms without computer access. The website also provides a variety of tools allowing users to collect and ma- nipulate items. “Create” presents the op- portunity to make individualized posters and movies out of any item or group of items from the website. After a free login, users can save and email these creations for future use.
BUILDING COMMUNITY: MEDIEVAL TECHNOLOGY AND AMERICAN HISTORY www.engr.psu.edu/mtah
Mills and ironworks played an important role in colonial America. This website explores some of the core medieval tech- nologies that built the American colonies into an industrial powerhouse, giving students the chance to explore industrial architecture, craftsmanship, and trade. In-depth articles, short essays, photo archives, videos, comparative timelines,
3
Abraham Zapruder Camera, National Archives and Records Administration, Digital Vaults
Issue 03 | January 2009
History Education News | teachinghistory.org
and class projects all seek to demon- strate how these technologies impacted American history. In addition, the website offers instructions and plans for projects that help students understand the mate- rial culture related to these technologies. For example, students can create their own clay oven, quern, or waterwheel testing device.
THE OBJECT OF HISTORY
objectofhistory.org
The Object of History features an abun- dance of materials designed to improve students’ content knowledge of standard topics in U.S. History and to improve their ability to understand material culture objects as types of historical evidence. Educators can use the teaching materials on the website to teach about featured
objects, such as Jefferson’s desk and the Greensboro Woolworth lunch counter. Students can then create their own virtual exhibit, putting these objects into historical context. Students can also download au- diocasts of curators and historians answer- ing questions about the featured objects.
ONLINE HISTORY LECTURES
Using objects as teaching tools is a great way to explore African American history month in February and year round. Explore the featured lectures below for ideas and discover many other online audio and vid- eo lectures on history and history education from public historians, educators, authors, and university professors through a search- able database at teachinghistory.org.
AFRICAN AMERICAN LIFE IN COLONIAL
MONTICELLO: OBJECTS
anacostia.si.edu/online_academy/academy/scholars/ scholarsframe.htm
Dianne Swann-Wright, Director of African- American and Special Programs at the
Thomas Jefferson Foundation, looks at what artifacts found at Monticello reveal about the personal lives of slaves on the estate. She demonstrates how objects such as gravestone carvings and tin cups found outside of slave dwellings show the agency of those who were enslaved.
INTERPRETING HOODOO ARTIFACTS:
THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SEARCH
anacostia.si.edu/online_academy/academy/scholars/ scholarsframe.htm
Historian Mark P. Leone looks at the hoodoo artifacts found at the Annapo- lis, Maryland, home of Charles Carroll,
4
Exterior, Charles Carroll House, Historic Annapolis Foundation
ASK A HISTORIAN
Have a question about U.S. his- tory? Let our expert historian help out. Login to teachinghistory.org and post your question today!
one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. He discusses how the lives of founding fathers and their African and African American slaves were intertwined and how these con- nections are represented by artifacts. Leone also talks about the significance of the artifacts, as the first discovery of a hoodoo cache in the area, and the later discovery of caches elsewhere dat- ing up to the 1920s.
PERFECT FOR YOUNGER STUDENTS!
LIFE OF AN APPRENTICE
winterthur.org/special_programs/school_programs.asp?
Visit the Winterthur Museum web- site to explore an interactive story on apprenticeship and craftsmanship in colonial America. Students decide what type of apprentice they would like to become and how to spend their allotted shillings. The story is illustrated with pictures and objects from the collection at Winterthur.
HISTORY CONTENT IN YOUR BACKYARD
Museums and historical societies are a great way to become familiar with mate- rial culture. While there is nothing like a trip to a local museum for a hands-on, inquiry based field trip, there are other ways to bring objects into your class- room. Check with your local museum to see if they offer similar programs! You can search for museums and historical societies at teachinghistory.org.
HISTORIC LANDMARKS FOUNDATION OF INDIANA: TRAVELING TRUNKS historiclandmarks.org
The Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana offers two education resource kits that can be mailed to educators. The kits, Stories Buildings Tell and Study Outdoor Sculpture, include activities, games, and lessons designed to open students’ eyes and minds to their environment. Each kit comes equipped with two activity books for teachers and hands-on materials for
students. Traveling Trunks are available on loan free of charge for one month, al- though borrowers pay for return shipping.
AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER: COMMUNITY STORIES OUTREACH KITS autrynationalcenter.org
Each kit offered by the Autry National Center in Los Angeles profiles a commu- nity through the eyes of an actual person. Their stories, traditions, challenges, and opportunities come to life through care- fully chosen resource materials and lesson plans, encouraging students to investigate their own family and community histories. The Center offers kits on various topics, including African Americans in the West, Chinese Americans in the West, migration, ranching, the Gold Rush, and immigra- tion. Two-week rental is $25.
5
Many museums and historic sites offer object-based learning for students. Old Sturbridge Village, Inc.
Issue 03 | January 2009
History Education News | teachinghistory.org
Best Practices
Material Culture (n.): in a given community or society, the material objects that people make, collect, and use, which give insight into the beliefs and customs held by that community.
The content on teachinghistory.org draws on the latest historical scholar- ship and research in the teaching and learning of history. Visit Best Practices at teachinghistory.org to explore tools that teach students how to read differ- ent kinds of primary sources, includ- ing objects, in addition to examples of historical thinking and teaching.
USING PRIMARY SOURCES
ANTIQUES ROADSHOW TEACHER’S GUIDE
pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/teachers.html
The creators of the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) series, Antiques Road- show developed this guide to help edu- cators integrate material culture into the classroom. Using artifacts from the show, such as late-nineteenth-century Ameri- can Indian clothing, a napkin drawing by Andy Warhol, and a Pioneer Packard toy pedal car, it presents strategies for teach- ing with material culture and questions to ask about how people make, collect, and use material objects.
SCHOLARS IN ACTION: ANALYZING AN 1804 INVENTORY historymatters.gmu.edu/mse/sia/inventory.htm
Scholars in Action presents case studies that demonstrate how scholars interpret different kinds of historical evidence. This 1804 inventory lists the posses- sions of Thomas Springer of New Castle County, Delaware. Legal documents,
such as tax records or probate invento- ries, often provide our only information about the lifestyles of people during the colonial and early national periods. Such listings of household possessions, from a time when household goods were not widely mass produced, can illuminate
a fair amount about a family’s routines, rituals, and social relations, as well as about a region’s economy and its con- nections to larger markets. This inventory also contains items that suggest attitudes and policies toward slavery in the mid- Atlantic states.
EXAMPLES OF TEACHING
EXPLORING HISTORICAL TEXTS IN A
DISCUSSION-BASED CLASS
learner.org/resources/series172.html#program_ descriptions
Trying to promote more productive and engaging discussions? Watch this high school teacher cultivate dialogue in the classroom while keeping his students focused on a set of primary sources.
6
Learning from Others: Learning in a Social Context is a video made up of two sections, the second half of which documents the practice of Avram Barlowe, a high school history teacher at the Urban Academy in New York City. The twelve-minute clip shows
a mixed-ability group of high school students discussing a set of primary source documents. The video also in- cludes comments from the instructor, who details his approach to promoting student understanding in the history classroom through discussion.
TEACHING WITH TEXTBOOKS
OPENING UP THE TEXTBOOK
historicalthinkingmatters.org/ted/lessons/
If you’re interested in teaching your students historical analysis, the text- book seems an unlikely resource. This strategy of Opening Up the Textbook (OUT), developed at Stanford University, is one method of using the textbook to help students learn how to think histori-
cally and read critically. OUT moves the textbook from its position as the one true story about the past to one historical ac- count among many. It is designed to help students slow down, read closely, and critically evaluate their textbook.
Read more at teachinghistory.org.
“This lesson structure portrays history as more complex than a single, sacrosanct story.”
—OPENING UP THE TEXTBOOK
7
Photo courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration.
Issue 03 | January 2009
History Education News | teachinghistory.org
Teaching Materials
Explore teachinghistory.org for ideas on how to teach a particular topic or for innovative ways to improve your lesson plans. Teaching Materials contains examples encompassing a range of time periods, topics, and grade levels that are ready for immediate classroom use.
LESSON PLAN REVIEWS
Classroom teachers have reviewed and critiqued these lesson plans according
to the National History Education Clear- inghouse rubric (available at http:// teachinghistory.org/teaching-materials/ lesson-plan-reviews/19230).
DWELLINGS: THE MESSAGE OF HOUSES AND THEIR CONTENTS, 1780-1820 americancenturies.mass.edu/classroom
Elementary
Drawing on the extensive collection of artifacts, photographs, and primary sources at the Massachusetts Memo- rial Hall Museum, this engaging lesson invites students to look at the homes and material possessions of people living in colonial America. Students pay particular attention to how the grow- ing peace and prosperity of the later colonial period are reflected in changes of furnishing and lifestyles. The lesson
encourages close observation of artifacts and guides students to write interpretive paragraphs about the steady increase in the quantity and quality of possessions in early American homes. It provides ample background material for teachers and clear suggestions for guiding discussion.
LINCOLN HOME NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE: A PLACE OF GROWTH AND MEMORY nps.gov/history/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/127liho/
High School
This lesson provides an opportunity for students to see how Lincoln’s home and life in Springfield, Illinois, influenced the way he thought about the important issues of the time. Students answer questions about photographs and maps to develop a context for thinking about documents related to Lincoln and the Civil War. An engaging set of vintage photographs and maps show Lincoln’s world and help students better under- stand the spirit of the times. But the real strength of this lesson is in the excellent text resources and accompanying ques- tions provided for students.
8
Anna and Hinsdale Williams House, Historic Deerfield, Inc.
COMING SOON TO TEACHING MATERIALS
TEACHING GUIDES
These guides, written for K–12 history teachers, provide concise summaries that address ways to use particular teaching resources and methods or ad- dress specific instructional challenges. Initial guides address using film and bi- ography in the classroom. Future guides focus on teaching students how to ana- lyze political cartoons, write thesis state- ments, or use the “structured academic controversy” instructional approach.
9
Initial pin souvenirs at the Pie Town, New Mexico Fair, c. 1940, Library of Congress: LC-USF35-375
NEWS
Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission
Celebrate the 200th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth this February with the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission’s free classroom poster! The front side, suitable for classroom display, is a portrait of Lincoln, while the reverse contains resources for educators, offering suggestions for incorporating Lincoln’s legacy into
the classroom. To request this poster, please call (202) 707-6998 or visit www.abrahamlincoln200.org, where you can also explore other valuable resources.
ACHP Announces Nationwide Youth Service Learning Effort
The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) urges historic preservation organizations to create local service learning and/or commu- nity service opportunities for students and school systems across the United States in an effort to more widely share and increase public awareness of the benefits of historic preservation. To learn how service learning can benefit preservation organizations and local communities and understand how to create such opportunities with local schools, visit http://www. servicelearning.org/instant_info/ historic_preservation/index.php.
ASK A MASTER TEACHER
Are you facing a challenge in your classroom? Login to teachinghistory.org and send your question to experienced teachers ready to help you find a solution.
Issue 03 | January 2009
History Education News | teachinghistory.org
Issues & Research
Stay up to date with current issues and research that affect history education.
RESEARCH BRIEFS
FIFTH GRADERS AS HISTORICAL DETECTIVES: READING, ANALYZING, AND CRITIQUING DOCUMENTS TO SOLVE HISTORICAL PUZZLES
Who says that elementary students can’t think historically? A researcher from the University of Maryland, College Park, chal- lenged that assumption in a recent study. VanSledright spent four months teaching fifth-grade American history in a diverse urban elementary school that included several English Language
Learners. For his study sample, he chose eight students of different skill levels. He closely followed students’ development as historical thinkers, and conducted before- and-after evaluations assessing their ability to analyze historical documents. Through direct instruction in historical analysis skills, Bruce VanSeldright’s students not
For their work on the American Revolution, students studied possible causes of the conflict. They were encouraged to consider point of view and understand the role of perspective in making sense of evidence. —FIFTH GRADERS AS
HISTORICAL DETECTIVES
only showed marked improvements in their work but also became excited about a subject in which they had previously expressed little interest.
TEACHING HISTORICAL REASONING AND
WRITING: A CLASSROOM INTERVENTION
In 2005, Susan de la Paz published one of the few experimental studies that investigated teaching for historical think- ing in real classrooms. The study was part of a Teaching American History grant and involved seventy eighth grade students, including eleven with learn- ing disabilities. De La Paz’s materials focused on nineteenth-century westward expansion and six topics in the middle
10
Teapot, England, c. 1765-1771, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation
school curriculum: the Indian Removal Act, the Whitman massacre of white mis- sionaries, the Mountain Meadows mas- sacre, Texas independence, women’s suffrage, and the Mexican-American War. Students received twelve days of
instruction in historical reasoning and ten days of instruction in writing arguments. Their final essays were significantly better than those of sixty-two control students who were not exposed to
these materials.
11
EXPLORE TEACHINGHISTORY.ORG
TELL US WHAT YOU THINK
We are grateful to our users who have let us know what they think about teachinghistory.org and History Education News!
The National History Education Clearinghouse is a new resource. We want to know what we can do to make the site more useful to you. Please take a moment and let us know what you think of the newsletter and the website at teachinghistory.org. Use the feedback form on the site, email comments to info@teachinghistory .org, or call us at 1-866-539-8381. We appreciate your time and all that you do for history education!
WEEKLY HISTORY QUIZ
IF YOU THINK THE MUDSLINGING WAS BAD IN THE 2008 CAMPAIGN, LOOK TO THE PAST. U.S. PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS HAVE NEVER BEEN WARM, FRIENDLY EVENTS.
Visit teachinghistory.org regularly to solve the weekly quiz and enter to win a National History Educa- tion Clearinghouse flash drive. Quiz categories include Textbook Twisters, By the Numbers, and American Myths.
Issue 03 | January 2009
History Education News | teachinghistory.org
TAH Grants
Explore resources related to Teaching American History (TAH) grants to learn from current and past projects and to plan for future grant applications.
LESSONS LEARNED
HISTORICAL EVIDENCE IN THE MATERIAL WORLD: ART HISTORY, MATERIAL CULTURE, AND HISTORICAL THINKING “On more than one occasion, teachers participating in our Teaching American History (TAH) project have speculated that one reason their middle school students often have trouble understanding historical
texts may be because they have not yet developed the ability to imagine the past. Because they are young their experience is limited and many have yet to discover museums, historic houses or other places of historical interest. In addition, the histori- cal past is not immediately evident on the surface in New York City, where it is often difficult to see through the many layers
of changes in the landscape and the built environment.” —Carolyn Halpin-Healy (New York, NY)
HEY! DON’T I KNOW YOU? MAKING CONNECTIONS TO THE PAST AND IN THE PRESENT “In the fall of 2007, I had the good fortune to be invited by Alex Stein of the U.S. Department of Education to speak at the Teaching American History (TAH) Grant Project Coordinators’ Conference in New Orleans, LA. To the audience of more than 750 participants, I told a story about an intriguing personal research experience inspired by a vague reference in an old annual report. My talk began with a suggestion for making connections
to information through documentary research; it concluded with a plea for making connections to people. In many ways, the transformation of my message in that presentation is reflective of my experience with the TAH program. Since the program began, my team at the Na- tional Archives in Washington, DC, and I have enjoyed being involved with dozens of grant-supported initiatives—colleagues
12
Illinois Works Progress Administration Project, c. 1936–1941, Library of Congress: LC-US2C2-5186
from urban, rural, large, and small dis- tricts, and everywhere in between.” —Lee Ann Potter (Washington, DC)
Read more at teachinghistory.org.
PROJECT SPOTLIGHTS
CONSTITUTIONAL CONNECTIONS
esd112.org/history/overview.cfm
Now in its fourth year in Washington State, the Teaching American History (TAH) grant, Constitutional Connections, has challenged teachers to teach U.S. history through the lens of the U.S. Constitu-
tion. To deepen their content knowledge, teachers have attended Constitutional Academies with nationally renowned scholars and summer Constitutional Institutes organized by the Constitutional Rights Foundation and they have traveled to James Madison’s Montpelier for semi- nars held at the home of the father of the Constitution. Teachers worked in History Professional Learning Teams (HPLTs), and over one hundred elementary, middle, and
high school teachers representing fifty-six schools have participated in the program. One participant described it as “the best and most important professional devel- opment program in (her) thirty-five-year career.”
—Washington
TEACHING AMERICAN HISTORY IN SOUTH CAROLINA teachingUShistory.org
South Carolina tackled professional development through two Teaching American History (TAH) grants and from a statewide perspective. Teaching Amer- ican History in South Carolina (TAHSC) emphasizes developing relationships between educators and local communi- ty resources in order to teach and learn history. From a pedagogical essay to vir- tual tours of selected local cultural and historical sites, TAHSC helps teachers develop innovative teaching techniques to connect national history to local and regional events, people, and places. The TAHSC website incorporates a variety
of teaching tools with an emphasis on
virtual tours and links to South Carolina cultural and historic sites to encour- age the use of community resources to teach history.
—South Carolina
13
MARK YOUR CALENDARS!
FOURTH ANNUAL TEACHING AMERICAN HISTORY (TAH) SYMPOSIUM March 25-26, 2009, in Seattle, Washington
This symposium, which will take place before the Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting, will include Profes-
sor Sam Wineburg of Stanford University as keynote speaker, discussing the impact that the TAH program is having on the larger fields of history and history education. Everyone involved in TAH grants (directors, evaluators, teachers, consultants) is invited to attend and participate.
Issue 03 | January 2009
History Education News | teachinghistory.org
Professional Development
At teachinghistory.org you can search for events and professional organizations nationally and in your backyard.
LINCOLN BICENTENNIAL 1809–2009
The year 2009 marks the 200th anni- versary of the birth of Abraham Lincoln. Plan now to participate in workshops, conferences, or other events that explore the life and times of Abraham Lincoln.
CONFERENCES
ABRAHAM LINCOLN
BICENTENNIAL CONFERENCE
April 24–25, 2009, in Cambridge, MA http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/houghton/lincoln.html
As part of the Lincoln Bicentennial cel- ebrations, Harvard University’s Houghton Library will cosponsor (with the Lincoln Forum and the Lincoln Group of Boston) a symposium on “Abraham Lincoln at 200: New Perspectives on His Life and Legacy.” The symposium, to be held at Houghton Library and other Harvard Uni- versity venues, will coincide with a major exhibition featuring books, manuscripts, ephemera, and artifacts from Houghton Library’s Abraham Lincoln Collection. The symposium will examine or reexam- ine several aspects of Lincoln’s career, including his views on race and slavery, his role as Commander-in-Chief, his use of the press to shape public opinion, his relationship with Congress and influence on the legislative process, and his role as a politician and a party leader.
CONFERENCE ON EMANCIPATION AND RACE
April 16–18, in Washington, DC abrahamlincoln200.org
The Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission and Howard University in Washington will co-produce a conference
on “Emancipation and Race in the Age of Lincoln.” The conference will focus on the international dimension of emancipa- tion and will compare different nations’ approaches to the issue of emancipation. The conference coincides with the Dis- trict of Columbia’s Emancipation Day and will feature public evening events.
GRANTS AND FELLOWSHIPS
HORACE MANN ABRAHAM
LINCOLN FELLOWSHIP
February 12th Deadline! https://www.horacemann.com/resources/fellowships/ default.aspx
This fellowship features a five-day institute in June and July 2009, at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield, Illinois, featuring a curricu- lum designed by the ALPLM Foundation. Round-trip transportation, lodging, and most meals are covered. The fellowship is open to full-time K-12 teachers from any discipline in the U.S. Applications are ac- cepted online.
14
WORKSHOPS
LINCOLN SUMMER SEMINAR, GILDER LEHRMAN INSTITUTE OF AMERICAN HISTORY
February 15th Deadline! July 5–11, 2009, at Gettysburg College gilderlehrman.org/teachers/seminars1.html
Professors Gabor Boritt and Matthew Pinsker examine the War President Abraham Lincoln and the transforma- tion of the United States during and after the Civil War. The seminar focuses on the central role of Gettysburg. Lecture topics include battlefields and soldiers; slavery and race; and Lincoln’s transition to a resolute war leader. The seminar is
open to public, parochial, and indepen- dent school teachers and National Park Service rangers.
COMMUNITY IN AFRICAN AMERICAN
CULTURE: 1917–1968
Online Workshop begins on February 12 Apply Now! Deadline to Register is January 16, 2009. nationalhumanitiescenter.org/ows/index.htm
This online workshop by the National Humanities Center explores African American identity and community from 1917 to 1968. Led by distinguished scholars, each workshop is conducted through lecture and discussion using conferencing software and runs sixty to ninety minutes. A resource work- shop identifies central themes within a topic and explores ways to teach them through the close analysis of primary texts, including works of art and the use of discussion questions. Texts are drawn from anthologies in the Center’s Toolbox Library. Participants need only a computer with an Internet connection, a speaker, and a microphone.
15
Allan Pinkerton, President Lincoln, and Maj. Gen. John A. McClernand, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
Issue 03 | January 2009
NONPROFIT ORG US POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 1532 FAIRFAX, VA 22030
Center for History and New Media George Mason University 4400 University Drive, MSN 1E7 Fairfax, VA 22030
teachinghistory.ORG

 
Content