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Colorado: 2nd-Grade Standards

CO.1. Standard: History

  • CO.1.1. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Identify historical sources and utilize the tools of a historian

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Identify community and regional historical artifacts and generate questions about their function and significance
    • b. Explain the past through oral or written firsthand accounts of history
    • c. Explain the information conveyed by historical timelines
    • d. Identify history as the story of the past preserved in various sources
    • e. Create timelines to understand the development of important community traditions and events

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. How can two people understand the same event differently?
    2. Why is it important to use more than one source for information?
    3. How can putting events in order by time help describe the past?
    4. What kinds of tools and sources do historical thinkers use to investigate the past?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. The ability to identify reliable historical sources is essential to searching for and communicating information. For example, individuals searching on the Internet must find reliable sources for information; reporters must find reliable information for news stories; and historians must use scholarly sources when writing nonfiction pieces.
    2. The tools of historians are used to share thoughts and ideas about the past such as selecting a historical name for a building, school, park, or playground; recounting a news event in the neighborhood; and using a timeline to gauge progress toward the completion of a project.
    Nature of History:
    1. Historical thinkers gather firsthand accounts of history through oral histories.
    2. Historical thinkers use artifacts and documents to investigate the past.
  • CO.1.2. Concepts and skills students master:

    • People have influenced the history of neighborhoods and communities

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Organize the historical events of neighborhoods and communities chronologically
    • b. Compare and contrast past and present situations, people, and events in neighborhoods, communities, and the nation
    • c. Give examples of people and events, and developments that brought important changes to the community
    • d. Compare how communities and neighborhoods are alike and different
    • e. Describe the history, interaction, and contribution of the various peoples and cultures that have lived in or migrated to neighborhoods and communities

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. How can understanding the past impact decision-making today?
    2. How have events and ideas from the past shaped the identity of communities and neighborhoods today?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Historical information and context are used to interpret, evaluate, and inform decisions or policies regarding current issues. For example, the history of a city determines how it might advertise for tourism purposes.
    2. Philosophies and ideas from history continue to inform and impact the present. For example, the independent Western philosophy affects how local government works.
    3. Technological developments continue to evolve and affect the present. An example of this would be the way communication is now almost instantaneous and thus, speeds up the nature of events.
    Nature of History:
    1. Historical thinkers investigate relationships between the past and present.
    2. Historical thinkers organize findings in chronological order as one way to examine and describe the past.

CO.2. Standard: Geography

  • CO.2.1. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Geographic terms and tools are used to describe space and place

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Use map keys ,legends, symbols, intermediate directions, and compass rose to derive information from various maps
    • b. Identify and locate various physical features on a map
    • c. Identify the hemispheres, equator, and poles on a globe
    • d. Identify and locate cultural, human, political, and natural features using map keys and legends

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. How do you define, organize, and think about the space around you?
    2. What is a human feature versus a physical feature?
    3. Why do we use geographical tools such as maps, globes, grids, symbols, and keys?
    4. How would you describe a setting without using geographic words?
    5. How can using the wrong geographic tool or term cause problems?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Individuals use geographic tools and technology such as observations, maps, globes, photos, satellite images, and geospatial software to describe space and uses of space.
    2. Individuals and businesses use maps to give directions.
    Nature of Geography:
    1. Spatial thinkers use visual representations of the environment.
    2. Spatial thinkers identify data and reference points to understand space and place.
  • CO.2.2. Concepts and skills students master:

    • People in communities manage, modify and depend on their environment

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Identify how communities manage and use nonrenewable and renewable resources
    • b. Identify local boundaries in the community
    • c. Explain why people settle in certain areas
    • d. Identify examples of physical features that affect human activity
    • e. Describe how the size and the character of a community change over time for geographic reasons

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. How do available resources and their uses create change in a community?
    2. Are renewable and nonrenewable resources managed well? How do you know?
    3. Why are physical features often used as boundaries?
    4. What are the various groups in a community and how are they alike and different?
    5. How do you choose if you should recycle, reduce, reuse, or throw something away?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Maps change over time.
    2. Individuals and businesses understand that they must manage resources in the environment such as conserving water, safeguarding clean air, managing electricity needs, and reducing the amount of waste.
    3. Communities collaborate to modify, manage, and depend on the environment. For example, elected officials decide how to manage resources, and communities may limit hunting, water usage, or other activities.
    4. Geographic technology is used to gather, track, and communicate how resources might be managed or modified. For example, ski areas track snowfall rates, analyze data for avalanche danger and even create snow.
    Nature of Geography:
    1. Spatial thinkers compare information and data, and recognize that environmental factors influence change in communities.
    2. Spatial thinkers study the uneven distribution and management of resources.

CO.3. Standard: Economics

  • CO.3.1. Concepts and skills students master:

    • The scarcity of resources affects the choices of individuals and communities

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Explain scarcity
    • b. Identify goods and services and recognize examples of each
    • c. Give examples of choices people make when resources are scarce
    • d. Identify possible solutions when there are limited resources and unlimited demands

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. How does scarcity affect purchasing decisions?
    2. What goods and services do you use?
    3. How are resources used in various communities?
    4. What are some ways to find out about the goods and services used in other communities?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Comparison of prices of goods and services in relationship to limited income helps to make informed and financially sound decisions.
    2. Decisions must be made if there is a limited amount of income and the need for a costly good or service. For example, you may borrow, save, or get a new job to make the purchase. (PFL)
    3. Scarcity of resources affects decisions such as where to buy resources based on cost or where to locate a business.
    Nature of Economics:
    1. Economic thinkers analyze how goods and services are produced and priced.
    2. Economic thinkers analyze scarcity of resources and its impact on cost of goods and services.
  • CO.3.2. Concepts and skills students master:

    • Apply decision-making processes to financial decisions (PFL)

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Identify components of financial decision-making including gathering, evaluating, and prioritizing information based on a financial goal, and predicting the possible outcome of a decision
    • b. Differentiate between a long-term and a short-term goal

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. How do individuals make and analyze the consequences of financial decisions?
    2. How do individuals meet their short- and long-term goals?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Personal financial decisions are based on responsible evaluation of the consequences.
    2. Purchase decisions are based on such things as quality, price, and personal goals. For example, you decide whether to spend money on candy or the movies.
    Nature of Economics:
    1. Financially responsible individuals use good decision-making tools in planning their spending and saving.
  • CO.4. Standard: Civics

    • CO.4.1. Concepts and skills students master:

      • Responsible community members advocate for their ideas

      Evidence Outcomes

      Students can:
      • a. List ways that people express their ideas respectfully
      • b. Identify how people monitor and influence decisions in their community
      • c. Describe ways in which you can take an active part in improving your school or community
      • d. Identify and give examples of civic responsibilities that are important to individuals, families, and communities
      • e. Describe important characteristics of a responsible community member

      21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

      Inquiry Questions:
      1. What are beliefs that help people live together in communities?
      2. What civic responsibilities do you think are important?
      3. How can different cultures and beliefs influence a community?
      4. What are responsible ways to advocate ideas in a community?
      Relevance and Application:
      1. Ideas are promoted through the use of various media such as blogs, websites, flyers, and newsletters.
      2. Individuals collaborate to responsibly advocate for the ideas they think will improve society. For example, a group lobbies the city council to create a new park or employ more firefighters.
      Nature of Economics:
      1. Responsible community members influence the rules, policies, and law in their communities.
  • CO.4.2. Concepts and skills students master:

    • People use multiple ways to resolve conflicts or differences

    Evidence Outcomes

    Students can:
    • a. Give examples of ways that individuals, groups, and communities manage conflict and promote equality, justice, and responsibility
    • b. Identify examples of power and authority and strategies that could be used to address an imbalance, including bullying as power without authority
    • c. Identify and give examples of appropriate and inappropriate uses of power and the consequences
    • d. Demonstrate skills to resolve conflicts or differences

    21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

    Inquiry Questions:
    1. What happens when someone uses power unwisely?
    2. What are good ways to solve differences?
    3. What would it be like if everyone was friends?
    4. What do equality, justice, and responsibility look like in the world?
    Relevance and Application:
    1. Conflict can arise for many reasons, including lack of information, or value or personality differences, and conflict may be resolved through compromise, competition, collaboration or avoidance. For example, parents may compromise about where to live.
    2. Various forms of conflict resolution are used to solve conflicts and differences. For example, city councils may call for a public hearing to learn what the community thinks about a new jail or library.
    Nature of Civics:
    1. Responsible community members know democratic and undemocratic principles and practices and how they are used in diverse communities.
    2. Responsible community members examine how culture influences the disposition of rules, laws, rights, and responsibilities.
    3. Responsible community members understand that power and authority shape individual participation.
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