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Colorado: 6th-Grade Standards

CO.1. Standard: History

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Develop an understanding of how people view, construct, and interpret history
  2. Analyze key historical periods and patterns of change over time within and across nations and cultures

CO.1.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Analyze and interpret historical sources to ask and research historical questions

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Identify ways different cultures record history
  • b. Interpret documents and data from multiple primary and secondary sources while formulating historical questions. Sources to include but not limited to art, artifacts, eyewitness accounts, letters and diaries, artifacts, real or simulated historical sites, charts, graphs, diagrams and written texts
  • c. Critique information to determine if it is sufficient to answer historical questions

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. What questions help us understand the development and interaction of peoples in the Western Hemisphere?
  2. How can different sources on the same topic vary and how can we determine which sources are most helpful in interpreting the past?
  3. What are the key primary sources that help to understand the history of the Western Hemisphere?
  4. How does the author or creator of a source influence the interpretation?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Individuals identify points of view, seek multiple sources, and develop and defend a thesis with evidence throughout life.
  2. Technology is used to explore and evaluate for accuracy of information.
  3. The context and content from the past is used to make connections to the present.
Nature of History:
  1. Historical thinkers evaluate historical sources for purpose, audience, point of view, context, reliability and authenticity.
  2. Historical thinkers use primary and secondary sources to evaluate and develop hypotheses and interpretations of historical events and figures that are supported by evidence.

CO.1.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • The historical eras, individuals, groups, ideas and themes in regions of the Western Hemisphere and their relationships with one another

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Explain how people, products, cultures, and ideas interacted and are interconnected over key eras in the Western Hemisphere
  • b. Determine and explain the historical context of key people, events, and ideas over time including the examination of different perspectives from people involved. Topics to include but not limited to Aztec, Maya, Inca, Inuit, early Native American cultures of North America, major explorers, colonizers of countries in the Western Hemisphere, and the Columbian Exchange
  • c. Identify examples of the social, political, cultural, and economic development in key areas of the Western Hemisphere

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. Why have civilizations succeeded and failed?
  2. To what extent does globalization depend on a society's resistance and adaptation to change over time?
  3. What factors influenced the development of civilizations and nations?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Historical information and context are used to interpret, evaluate, and inform decisions or policies regarding current issues such as the impact of the Columbian exchange on the world today.
  2. Philosophies and ideas from history continue to inform and affect the present such as the Aztec, Maya, and Inca influence.
  3. Technological developments continue to evolve and affect the present. For example, the speed of communication is almost instantaneous with blogs and the Internet.
Nature of History:
  1. Historical thinkers analyze patterns and themes throughout time.
  2. Historical thinkers study people places, ideas, and events to construct the story of
    history from multiple perspectives.
  3. Historical thinkers use chronology to organize time.
  4. Historical thinkers examine data for point of view, historical context, or propaganda.

CO.2. Standard: Geography

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Develop spatial understanding, perspectives, and personal connections to the world
  2. Examine places and regions and the connections among them

CO.2.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Use geographic tools to solve problems

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Use longitude, latitude, and scale on maps and globes to solve problems
  • b. Collect and analyze data to interpret regions in the Western Hemisphere
  • c. Ask multiple types of questions after examining geographic sources
  • d. Interpret and communicate geographic data to justify potential solutions to problems
  • e. Distinguish different types of maps and use them in analyzing an issue

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How can geographic tools be used to solve problems in the future?
  2. How does where we live influence how we live?
  3. How do populations, physical features, resources, and perceptions of places and regions change over time?
  4. How has land been acquired by countries?
  5. How have geographic factors influenced human settlement and economic activity?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Technology is used by individuals and businesses to answer geographic problems such as the spread of disease, migration patterns, and distribution and loss of resources like water supplies.
  2. Geographic tools help to solve problems in daily life. For example, a car GIS is used to find a location, maps are used by tourists, and directions are found on the Internet.
Nature of Geography:
  1. Spatial thinkers use geographic tools to develop spatial thinking and awareness.
  2. Spatial thinkers evaluate patterns that connect people and their problems to the
    world.

CO.2.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Human and physical systems vary and interact

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Classify and analyze the types of connections between places
  • b. Identify physical features and explain their effects on people in the Western Hemisphere
  • c. Give examples of how people have adapted to their physical environment
  • d. Analyze positive and negative interactions of human and physical systems in the Western Hemisphere

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. What are different ways to define the Western Hemisphere based on human and physical systems?
  2. How have people interacted with the environment over time in a positive or negative way?
  3. How has globalization affected people and places?
  4. In what ways are places on Earth interdependent?
Relevance and Application:
  1. The study of how human and physical systems vary and interact helps to make better choices, decisions, and predictions. For example, resource distribution or trade is based on geographic features and environmental changes over time effect a business.
  2. Businesses analyze data regarding physical and human systems to make informed choices regarding production, trade, and resource acquisition.
  3. Nations use geographic information about human and physical systems to make decisions such as establishing trade routes, locating cities, trade centers and capitals, and establishing outposts and security systems like forts and walls.
Nature of Geography:
  1. Spatial thinkers examine places and regions and the connections among them.

CO.3. Standard: Economics

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Understand the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of individual choice, market interaction, and public policy
  2. Acquire the knowledge and economic reasoning skills to make sound financial decisions (PFL)

CO.3.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Identify and analyze different economic systems

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Describe the characteristic of traditional, command, market, and mixed economic systems
  • b. Explore how different economic systems affect job and career options and the population’s standards of living
  • c. Use economic reasoning to explain why certain careers are more common in one region than in another and how specialization results in more interdependence

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How do different systems address the production of goods?
  2. How are scarce resources distributed in different types of economic systems?
  3. How do different economies control the means of production and distribution of goods and services?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Economic development varies and can be compared across countries in the Western Hemisphere including levels of education and average income.
  2. Governments and the private sector in the Western Hemisphere cooperate to distribute goods and services, specialize, and are interdependent in the global economy.
  3. Career opportunities are influenced by the type of economic system.
Nature of Economics:
  1. Economic thinkers study how and why individuals make decisions about purchases.
  2. Economic thinkers analyze why different markets develop in different locations.
  3. Economic thinkers study the effects of different types of economies on global interdependence.

CO.3.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Saving and investing are key contributors to financial well-being (PFL)

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Differentiate between saving and investing
  • b. Give examples of how saving and investing can improve financial well-being
  • c. Describe the advantages and disadvantages of saving for short- and medium-term goals
  • d. Explain the importance of an emergency fund
  • e. Explain why saving is a prerequisite to investing
  • f. Explain how saving and investing income can improve financial well-being

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. Why is it important to save and invest?
  2. What types of items would an individual save for to purchase?
  3. What are risky investments and why would someone make that type of investment?
  4. Why is it important to research and analyze information prior to making financial decisions?
Relevance and Application:
  1. It’s important to understand why to save and invest for the future.
  2. Technology allows individuals and businesses to track investment earnings.
  3. The creation of criteria for use of emergency funds helps to save responsibly.
  4. The comparison of returns of various savings and investment options and an adjustment of the investments for good financial decision-making.
Nature of Economics:
  1. Financially responsible individuals manage savings and investments for their financial well-being.
  2. Financially responsible individuals understand the risks and rewards associated with investing and saving.

CO.4. Standard: Civics

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Analyze origins, structure, and functions of governments and their impacts on societies and citizens
  2. Analyze and practice rights, roles, and responsibilities of citizens

CO.4.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Analyze the interconnectedness of the United States and other nations

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Discuss advantages and disadvantages of living in an interconnected world
  • b. Examine changes and connections in ideas about citizenship in different times and places
  • c. Describe how groups and individuals influence the government and other nations
  • d. Explain how political ideas and significant people have interacted, are interconnected, and have influenced nations
  • e. Analyze political issues from both a national and global perspective over time
  • f. Identify historical examples illustrating how Americans from diverse backgrounds perceived and reacted to various global issues

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. What does it mean to live in an interconnected world?
  2. How can you be a productive member of the global community and a contributing citizen of the United States?
  3. Why are there greater challenges and opportunities when multiple groups interact?
  4. Why are national and global viewpoints sometimes different?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Nations are interconnected and affect each other on a daily basis. For example, businesses are affected by the laws, regulations, nations and markets are damaged by drought, earthquakes and other natural disasters throughout the world.
  2. Technology provides daily information regarding the interaction between the United States government and other nations.
Nature of Civics:
  1. Responsible community members discuss and analyze how various government decisions impact people, places, and history.
  2. Responsible community members analyze how the actions of individuals and groups can have a local, nation, and international impact.
  3. Responsible community members analyze the relationship between rights and responsibility in national and global contexts.

CO.4.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Compare multiple systems of government

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Describe different forms of government
  • b. Identify how different forms of government relate to their citizens. Topics to include but limited to democracy and authoritarian government
  • c. Compare the economic components of different forms of government
  • d. Compare various governments’ and the liberties of their citizens

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How do you define good government?
  2. What evidence can you find of effective and ineffective governments in the past and the present?
  3. What would a government look like if you created it?
  4. What are the consequences if a government does not provide for the common good?
Relevance and Application:
  1. The ability to understand the different forms of government affects daily life.For example, employees work in international corporations and tourists visit countries with different laws, rules, and regulations.
  2. Knowledge of government is essential for understanding the implications of events around the world.
Nature of Civics:
  1. Responsible community members discuss personal and national actions and their global consequences.
  2. Responsible community members identify ways in which lives are enriched and challenged because of the interconnected nature of a global society.
 
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