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Colorado: Prekindergarten Standards

CO.1. Standard: History

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Develop an understanding of how people view, construct, and interpret history

CO.1.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Change and sequence over time

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Use words and phrases correctly related to chronology and time. Words to include but not limited to past, present future, before, now, and later.
  • b. Select examples from pictures that illustrate past, present, and future
  • c. Sequence a simple set of activities or events
  • d. Identify an example of change over time on topics to include but not limited to their own growth

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How have you grown and changed over time?
  2. What are important events in your past, your family's past,or the past of an adult you know?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Change occurs over time and has an impact on individuals and society.
  2. Sequence and sequencing helps with understanding, such as the sequence of equations in mathematics.
  3. Technology is used to record change and sequence.For example, clocks, calendars, and timelines record change.
Nature of History:
  1. Historical thinkers study and describe past events and change over time in the lives of people.
  2. Historical thinkers organize past events using chronology.

CO.2. Standard: Geography

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Develop spatial understanding, perspectives, and personal connections to the world

CO.2.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Develop spatial understanding, perspectives, and connections to the world

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Use positional phrasing. Phrases to include but not limited to: over and under, here and there, inside and outside, up and down
  • b. Identify common places to include but limited to home, school, cafeteria, and gymnasium
  • c. Describe surroundings
  • d. Use pictures to locate familiar places
  • e. Use nonlinguistic representations to show understanding of geographic terms

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. How do you describe your surroundings?
  2. Where is this place located?
  3. What would the playground look like if it were organized in a different way?
  4. What is a geographical term?
  5. What is the importance of location?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Specific vocabulary describes space and locations such as the books are under the table, and the pencil is next to the telephone.
  2. Words can describe surroundings. For example, the dentist is inside her office; the firefighter is on the truck; and the puppy is inside the doghouse.
  3. Knowledge about location through personal experience integrates geographic terms with spatial thinking.
  4. Individuals perform different activities in different places.For example,cooking is done in the kitchen, hiking in the mountains, walking the dog in the park, learning in school, and working in a store.
Nature of Geography:
  1. Spatial thinkers investigate other cultures and how they have been influenced by climate, physical geography, and other cultures in an area
  2. Spatial thinkers understand that space is organized, have personal experiences with their environment, and look for patterns.

CO.3. Standard: Economics

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Understand the allocation of scarce resources in societies through analysis of individual choice, market interaction, and public policy
  2. Acquire the knowledge and economic reasoning skills to make sound financial decisions (PFL)

CO.3.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • People work to meet wants and needs

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Explain that people work (produce) for an income
  • b. Discuss that money is used to buy items that the student or family wants
  • c. Give examples to distinguish spending from saving

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. What might happen if no one worked?
  2. What do we buy and why?
  3. How do people use income?
  4. Why do you save income?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Working enables people to meet wants. For example, a parent works to receive income used to purchase items such as food, cars and vacations.
Nature of Economics:
  1. Economic thinkers analyze the connection between working and earning income.
  2. Economic thinkers recognize that people use income to meet needs and wants.

CO.3.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Recognize money and identify its purpose (PFL)

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Recognize coins and currency as money
  • b. Identify how money is used as a medium of exchange
  • c. Discuss why we need money

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. Why do people use money?
  2. What are the different forms of money?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Recognition of units of money aids in making purchases. For example, a parent pays for an item using correct change.
  2. Knowledge of coins and currency ensures accurate transactions.Forexample,you can check that a cashier gave you the right amount of change.
  3. Money is a medium of exchange.
Nature of Economics:
  1. Financially responsible individuals use money wisely.

CO.4. Standard: Civics

Prepared Graduates:

  1. Analyze origins, structure, and functions of governments and their impacts on societies and citizens
  2. Analyze and practice rights, roles, and responsibilities of citizens

CO.4.1. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Individuals have unique talents and work with others in groups

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Recognize membership in family, neighborhood, school, team, and various other groups and organizations
  • b. Name groups to which they belong and identify the leader(s)
  • c. Identify examples of times when people can play different roles and bring unique talents to a variety of groups

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. What makes an individual unique?
  2. Why would a person want to belong to a group?
  3. How can differences among group members make groups better?
Relevance and Application:
  1. People join groups based on similar interests and talents such as dance groups, Boy Scouts, or play groups
  2. Groups have common purposes such as cleaning up a street, helping students learn, or playing a sport.
  3. There are different roles in groups including leaders and team members.
Nature of Civics:
  1. Responsible community members know the roles of individuals vary by the purpose of the group.
  2. Responsible community members study citizen participation and structures that bring security and stability to community life.
  3. Responsible community members identify qualities of leadership and effective action.

CO.4.2. Concepts and skills students master:

  • Rules and their purpose in allowing groups to work effectively

Evidence Outcomes

Students can:
  • a. Explain that groups have rules
  • b. Recognize interpersonal boundaries
  • c. Exert self-control
  • d. Interact positively with others
  • e. Give examples of some rules that are
    permanent and some that change

21st-century Skills and Readiness Competencies

Inquiry Questions:
  1. What happens when people do not work cooperatively?
  2. What personal boundaries are common?
  3. What happens if there are no rules?
Relevance and Application:
  1. Actions affect us and others. For example, fighting may result in injury and punishment.
  2. Rules are different in different settings.For example, school rules may be different from home rules.
  3. Situations may be fairer because of rules such as taking turns on playground equipment.
Nature of Civics:
  1. Responsible community members identify the effects of rules on individuals and groups.
  2. Responsible community members investigate the causes of inequities that exist within and among groups.
  3. Responsible community members study the tension between preserving security, and order and liberty.
 
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