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Connecticut: 11th-Grade Standards

(Note: By the completion of twelfth grade, Connecticut students are expected to master the following standards.)

Content Suggestion:

  • American History — This required course should emphasize 20th/21st century events with review of earlier events where necessary to provide appropriate background and context.
  • World History/International Studies—Whether using a chronological or thematic approach, this required course should include a significant amount of 20th/21st century material with review of earlier events where necessary to provide appropriate background and context.
  • Civics — The half-year required course should go beyond the organization and structure of government to emphasize applications to local, state and national issues.
  • Electives — Most districts offer economics, geography, psychology, and other social science courses.

1.1 – Significant events and themes in United States history.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 1. Apply chronological thinking to examine relationships among events and explain causes and effects of events.
  • 2. Investigate the causes and effects of migration within the United States (e.g. westward movement, African American Diaspora, urbanization, suburbanization).
  • 3. Analyze the evolution of citizens’ rights (e.g. Palmer Raids, struggle for civil rights, women’s rights movements, Patriot Act).
  • 4. Evaluate the changing role of U.S. participation and influence in world affairs (e.g. trade, United Nations, NATO, globalization).
  • 5. Evaluate the changing nature of the U.S. economy (e.g. agrarian, manufacturing, service, rise of unions, “green movement”).
  • 6. Assess the influence of geography on the development of the United States (e.g. settlement patterns, natural disasters, resources, environmental issues).
  • 7. Compare and contrast various American Beliefs, values and political ideologies (e.g. political parties, nativism, Scopes trial, McCarthyism).
  • 8. Analyze the influence of nationalism on American society (e.g. wartime conservation programs, immigration policies, Japanese-American internment).
  • 9. Analyze the influence of sectionalism on American life (e.g. urban vs. rural, “solid south”, “red” states vs. “blue” states).
  • 10. Assess the significance of the evolving heterogeneity of American society (e.g. role of immigrants, contributions of minority groups).
  • 11. Analyze the impact of technology and scientific discovery on American society (e.g. vaccines, interstate highways, space race, telecommunications).
  • 12. Analyze how the arts, architecture, music and literature of the United States reflect its history and cultural heterogeneity (e.g. New Orleans Jazz, Harlem Renaissance, Frank Lloyd Wright, Maya Angelou, rock ‘n’ roll).
  • 13. Evaluate the role and impact that significant individuals have had on historical events (e.g. Susan B. Anthony, Eleanor Roosevelt, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Ronald Reagan).
Correlations

Communication
Collaboration
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Civic Literacy
Creativity and Innovation
Information Literacy
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
2. NCSS 2, “Time, Continuity, and Change”
2. NCSS 3, “People, Places, and Environments”
3. NCSS 6, “Power, Authority, and Governance”
3. NCSS 10, “Civic Ideals and Practices”
4. NCSS 9, “Global Connections”
4. NCSS 3 “People, Places, and Environments”
5. NCSS 7, “Production, Distribution, and Consumption”
6. NCSS 3, “People, Places, and Environments”
7. NCSS 10, “Civic Ideals and Practices”
8. NCSS 1, “Culture”
9. NCSS 2, “Time, Continuity, and Change”
10. NCSS 1, “Culture”,
10. NCSS 4, “Individual Development and Identity”
11. NCSS 8, “Science, Technology, and Society”
12. NCSS 1, “Culture” , 4
13. NCSS 3, “People, Places, and Environments”
13. NCSS 4, “Individual Development and Identity”
13. NCSS 5, “Individuals, Groups, and Institutions”

1.2 – Significant events in local and Connecticut history and their connections to United States history.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 14. Analyze how events and people in Connecticut reflect and have contributed to developments in United States history (e.g. Samuel Colt, John Brown, Ella Grasso’s election, Senator Lieberman switching political parties).
  • 15. Describe how major events in U.S. history affected Connecticut citizens (e.g. Great Depression, World War II, Civil Rights).
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Civic Literacy
Communication
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
14, 15. NCSS 2, “Time, Continuity, and Change”

1.3 – Significant events and themes in world history/international studies.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 16. Describe and evaluate models of historical periodization used to categorize events.
  • 17. Apply chronological thinking to examinerelationships among events and explain causes and effects of events.
  • 18. Assess how a civilization/nation’s arts, architecture, music, and literature reflect its culture and history.
  • 19. Explain the significance of globalization (e.g. cross-border migrations economic trade, cultural exchange) on the world’s nations and societies (spread of colonial rule in Asia and Africa, nationalist revolt in the Middle East, revolutions in China, Latin America)
  • 20. Assess the causes and impacts of imperialism (e.g. colonial rule, revolution, dictatorships, Cold War, independence movements, etc.).
  • 21. Analyze conflict and cooperation in world affairs (e.g. World Wars I and II, United Nations, Israel- Palestine, Kosovo, Afghanistan, Cote d’Ivoire, Middle East, North Africa)
  • 22. Compare and contrast political systems across historical time periods (e.g. totalitarianism/authoritarian, monarchy/theocracy, representative/parliamentary democracy).
  • 23. Compare and contrast economic systems across historical time periods (e.g. traditional, market, command, and mixed).
  • 24. Compare and contrast the rise and fall of prominent civilizations (e.g. Greek, Roman, Mesopotamian, India, China, Muslim empires).
  • 25. Analyze the impact of technological and scientific change on world civilizations (e.g. printing press, gun powder, vaccine, and computers).
  • 26. Analyze nationalism’s impact on world events (e.g. Balkans and World War I, Latin American 19th century authoritarianism, revolution and dictatorship in the Middle East, westernization in Russia, China, and Southeast Asia).
  • 27. Analyze the cause and results of political/social revolution (e.g. October Revolution in Russia, Cuban Revolution, Industrial revolution, French revolution, 20th century revolutions in Turkey, China, India, Indonesia, Vietnam, Egypt and Iran).
  • 28. Evaluate the role and impact of the significant individuals on historical events (e.g. Karl Marx, Gandhi, Adolf Hitler, Mao Zedong, Nelson Mandela, Arafat, Che Guevara, Gorbachev, Osama bin Laden).
  • 29. Evaluate the impact of major belief systems on societies and nations (e.g. religions, philosophies, political theories)
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Global Awareness
Financial Literacy
Civic Literacy
Communication
Collaboration
Information Literacy
Media Literacy
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
17. NCSS 1, “Culture” 18. NCSS 9, “Global Connections”
19. NCSS 6, “Power, Authority, and Governance”
20. NCSS 2, “Time, Continuity, and Change” 21. NCSS 2, ”Time, Continuity, and Change”
21. NCSS 3, “People, Places, and Environments”
21. NCSS 6. “Power, Authority, and Governance”
22. NCSS 2, “Time, Continuity, and Change”
22. NCSS 7, “Production, Distribution, and Consumption”
23. NCSS 2, “Time, Continuity, and Change” 24. NCSS 8, “Science, Technology, and Society”
25. NCSS 2, ““Time, Continuity, and Change”
26. NCSS 2, “Time, Continuity, and Change” 27. NCSS 2, “Time, Continuity, and Change”
28. NCSS 2, “Time, Continuity, and Change”

1.4 – Geographical space and place.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 30. Explain how technological developments have changed our perception and understanding of location and space in the modern world (telecommunications, internet, e-mail, transportation).
  • 31. Analyze how geographic location and physical features have influenced national histories.
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Financial Literacy
Communication
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
30. NCSS 8, “Science, Technology, and Society”
31. NCSS 3, “People, Places, and Environments

1.5 – Interaction of humans and the environment.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 32. Analyze how a specific environment has influenced historical developments in a region/nation of the world.
  • 33. Analyze globalization’s impact on peoples around the world.
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Global Awareness
I&TL: 1,2,3,5,6
32. NCSS 3, “People, Places, and Environments”
33. NCSS 3 “People, Places, and Environments”
33. NCSS 9, “Global Connections”

1.6 – Patterns of human movement across time and place.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 34. Explain how environmental factors cause human movement (e.g.’ drought, disease, natural disasters).
  • 35. Analyze geographical influences on the United States’ development (e.g. settlement patterns, natural disasters, resources, land-use patterns).
  • 36. Analyze migration patterns within and among nations.
  • 37. Analyze human factors that cause migration (e.g. imperialism, discrimination, war, economic opportunity, genocide).
  • 38. Compare and contrast migration’s impact on the country of origin and country of settlement.
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Global Awareness
Communication
Collaboration
Information Literacy
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
35, 36, 37, 38, 39. NCSS 3, “People, Places, and Environments”

1.7 – The purpose, structures and functions of government and law at the local, state, national and international levels.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 39. Compare and contrast how different national governments throughout the world attempt to meet their citizens’ needs.
  • 40. Analyze the relationship between national governments and international organizations.
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Civic Literacy
Global Awareness
Collaboration
Information Literacy
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6
39, 40. NCSS 6, “Power, Authority, and Governance”

1.8 – The interactions between citizens and their government in the making and implementation of laws.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 41. Analyze laws that have been modified to meet society’s changing values and needs (e.g. civil rights laws, banking regulations, Prohibition).
  • 42. Evaluate how different factors (e.g. religion, economic class, social class, race) contribute to making and implementing laws in different government systems.
  • 43. Explain how the Constitution limits the powers of government and protects the accused.
  • 44. Analyze the role of technology, media and advertising in influencing voting and law making.
  • 45. Assess the role of lobbying and citizen petitioning in shaping legislation.
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Civic Literacy
ITC Literacy
Media Literacy
Communication
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
42, 43, 44, 45. NCSS 10, “Civic Ideals and Practices”
44. NCSS 4, “Individual Development, and Identity”
45. NCSS, 8 “Science, Technology, and Society”

1.9 – The rights and responsibilities of citizens.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 46. Investigate how individuals or groups have worked to expand or limit citizens’ rights in the United States and other nations (e.g. human rights groups, Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, Mary McLeod Bethune, Martin Luther King, George McCarthy, Nazi Holocaust, Che Guevara).
  • 47. Analyze the tension between the need for national security and protection of individual rights (e.g. World War I Sedition Act, Patriot Act).
  • 48. Analyze historical and contemporary examples of the efforts to ensure human rights at the national and international levels (e.g. Amnesty International, Geneva Conventions, U.N. Declaration of Human Rights).
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Global Awareness
Civic Literacy Communication
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
47, 48, 49. NCSS 6, “Power, Authority, and Governance”
47, 48, 49. NCSS 10, “Civic Ideals and Practices”

1.10 – How limited resources influence economic decisions.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 49. Describe how a nation’s availability of resources has changed over time (e.g. war, expansion, trade).
  • 50. Analyze how the abundance or scarcity of resources affects the nation and the individual
  • 51. Analyze how a government‘s resources can be used to influence economic decisions.
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Financial Literacy
Civic Literacy
Communication
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
50, 51, 52. NCSS 7, “Production, Distribution, and Consumption”

1.11 – How different economic systems organize resources.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 52. Analyze how governments with different economic systems can influence production and distribution.
  • 53. Examine how government activity (e.g. tariffs, taxes, social reforms) can influence an individual’s economic decisions.
  • 54. Analyze how government policies (e.g. taxation, spending) can influence how people and businesses use resources.
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Financial Literacy
Civic Literacy
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6
53, 54, 55. NCSS 7, “Production, Distribution, and Consumption”

1.12 – The interdependence of local, national and global economies.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 55. Explain how trade surpluses and deficits develop.
  • 56. Compare and contrast free trade and fair trade.
  • 57. Analyze ways governments and international organizations can promote or inhibit economic development.
  • 58. Analyze factors that encourage a business to relocate to another region or country.
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Financial Literacy
Civic Literacy
Global awareness
Communication
Collaboration
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
57, 58, 59. NCSS 3 “People, Places, and Environments”
56, 57, 58, 59. NCSS 7, “Production, Distribution, and Consumption”
56, 57, 58, 59. NCSS 9, “Global Connections”

1.13 – The characteristics of and interactions among culture, social systems and institutions.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 59. Demonstrate the importance of viewing a culture though a variety of perspectives.
  • 60. Analyze examples of the impact of cultural diversity in different nations (e.g. Iraq, the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, South Africa).
  • 61. Analyze the impact of family, religion, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status on personal development.
  • 62. Analyze the impact of family, religion, gender, ethnicity and socioeconomic status on the development of culture.
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Global awareness
Collaboration
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6
60, 61, 62, 63. NCSS 1 “Culture”

Standard 2: History/Social Studies Literacy

Competence in literacy, inquiry, and research skills is necessary to analyze, evaluate, and present history and social studies information.

2.1 – Access and gather information from a variety of primary and secondary sources including electronic media (maps, charts, graphs, images, artifacts, recordings and text).

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 1. Gather relevant and accurate information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively.
  • 2. Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
  • 3. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question, including self-generated questions, or to solve a problem.
  • 4. Draw information from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Correlations

RH9-12- 1, 10
WHST9-12- 7, 8, 9
Information Literacy
Media Literacy
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
ICT Literacy
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6

2.2 – Interpret information from a variety of primary and secondary sources, including electronic media (e.g. maps, charts, graphs, images, artifacts, recordings and text).

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 5. Choose valid sources and provide evidence to answer a history/social studies question.
  • 6. Determine the central ideas of, and be able to, summarize information from primary and secondary sources.
  • 7. Evaluate various explanations for actions or events and determine which explanation best accords with textual evidence, acknowledging where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • 8. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term over the course of a text.
  • 9. Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole
  • 10. Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence
  • 11. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media in order to address a question or solve a problem.
  • 12. Interpret social/political messages of visuals (e.g. political cartoons, posters, photographs, art of a period)
  • 13. Detect bias in data presented in various forms
  • 14. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.
Correlations

RH9-12- 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
SL9-12- 3
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Communication
Information Literacy
Media Literacy
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6

2.3 – Create various forms of written work (e.g. journal, essay, blog, Web page, brochure) to demonstrate an understanding of historyand social studies issues.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 15. Create written work (e.g. electronic medium or persuasive pieces) that analyzes a historical event, place or person using various sources.
  • 16. Write informative/explanatory texts about events and topics
  • 17. Compose a thesis statement using primary and secondary sources.
  • 18. Write arguments using discipline-specific content.
  • 19. Write informative/explanatory texts including the narration of historical events.
  • 20. Integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a common form for citation
Correlations

RH9-12- 7, 9
WHST9-12- 1, 2
Creativity and Innovation
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Communication
Information Literacy
Media Literacy
ICT Literacy
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

2.4 – Demonstrate an ability to participate in social studies discourse through informed discussion, debate and effective oral presentation.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 21. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on social studies topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively
  • 22. Prepare formal oral arguments using relevant evidence from primary and secondary sources to defend a point of view.
  • 23. Ask relevant questions related to social studies/history to initiate, extend or debate a point of view.
  • 24. Present claims and findings, emphasizing salient points, in a focused and coherent manner with relevant evidence, sound reasoning, and well- chosen details; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and clear pronunciation
Correlations

SL9-12- 1, 2, 4, 6
Creativity and Innovation
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Communication
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

2.5 – Create and present relevant social studies materials using both print and electronic media (e.g. maps, charts, models, displays).

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 25. Create relevant visual social studies materials (e.g. maps. Political cartoons, charts, Web pages) to support an essay or oral report.
  • 26. Create multipurpose visuals (e.g. graphic maps, pictographs) to present information.
  • 27. Represent information in various formats, including strategic use of digital media to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
Correlations

SL9-12- 5
Creativity and Innovation
Communication
Media Literacy
ICT Literacy
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

Standard 3: Civic Engagement

Civic competence in analyzing historical issues and current problems requires the synthesis of information, skills, and perspective.

3.1 – Use evidence to identify, analyze and evaluate historical interpretations.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 1. Use evidence to develop an interpretation of a historical event.
  • 2. Evaluate primary and secondary interpretations of a historical event.
  • 3. Use evidence to assess the role of tradition and customs on an individual or group’s choices/decisions.
  • 4. Predict how alternative actions by individuals or groups might have changed a historical outcome.
  • 5. In a group or team, research, analyze and present a current issue identifying all sides (of the issue).
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Information Literacy
Flexibility and Adaptability
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 5, 6,

3.2 – Analyze and evaluate human action in historical and/or contemporary contexts from alternative points of view.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 6. Develop criteria for assessing the actions or policies of an individual or group in the past.
  • 7. Portray the attitudes reflected in a historical period using a variety of writing formats (eulogy, editorial, diary).
  • 8. Develop criteria to evaluate alternative viewpoints on a contemporary issue.
  • 9. Analyze how one’s historical memory can contribute to one’s view of a contemporary issue or event.
  • 10. Cite examples and analyze how people and/or personal accounts can influence historical memory.
Correlations

Creativity and Innovation
Communication
Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Collaboration
Information Literacy
Flexibility and Adaptability
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

3.3 - Apply appropriate historical, geographic, political, economic and cultural concepts and methods in proposing and evaluating solutions to contemporary problems.

Grade Level Expectations
Students will be able to:

  • 11. Evaluate a proposed solution to a contemporary political, economic, geographic/environmental or social problem.
  • 12. Research a current issue and predict an outcome using relevant geographic, political, economic, cultural and historical evidence.
  • 13. Formulate a historical question and devise a research procedure that would lead to an answer.
  • 14. Devise a plan to resolve a local contemporary issue and develop a proposal for implementation.
Correlations

Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
Collaboration
Information Literacy
Social and Cross- Cultural Skills
Flexibility and Adaptability
Productivity and Accountability
Leadership and Responsibility
I&TL: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

 
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