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DC: Kindergarten Standards

(Note: In 2011, DC public schools began transitioning to the Common Core State Standards.)

  • Geography

    • K.1. Broad Concept: Students demonstrate an understanding of the concept of location.

      Students:

      1. Identify words and phrases that indicate location and direction (e.g., up, down, near, far, left, right, straight, back, behind, and in front of ). (G)
      2. Demonstrate familiarity with what a map is and what a globe is. (G)
      3. Identify the student’s street address, city, and the United States as the country in which he or she lives. (G)
      4. Identify the name of the student’s school and the ward in which it is located. (G)
      5. Identify the location and features of places in the immediate neighborhood of the student’s home or school. (G)

      Examples

      • In small groups, students locate landmasses and bodies of water on a map. Students locate the same information on a globe. Students brainstorm the differences and similarities between maps and globes (K.1.2).
      • On a simple map of the block on which the school is located, students take a “field trip” to note prominent features around the school (e.g., buildings, playground, parking lot, surrounding streets). With assistance from the teacher, students create a map on butcher paper with blocks to represent buildings, toy cars in the parking lot, and other common items. After building a three-dimensional map, students draw and label one of their own based on it (K.1.5).
  • Historical Thinking

    • K.2. Broad Concept: Students describe the way people lived in earlier times and how their lives would be different today (e.g., getting water from a well, growing food, having fun). (S)

      Examples

      • Students view artwork and artifacts from times within the past century. Students then draw a series of pictures depicting three aspects of past life (e.g., chores/responsibilities, housing, food, transportation, or family) that tell the story of a child growing up in earlier times. Students compile the pictures into a class book (K.2).
    • K.3. Broad Concept: Students place familiar events in order of occurrence.

      Students:

      1. Identify days of the week and months of the year.
      2. Locate events on a calendar, including birthdays, holidays, cultural events, and school events.

      Examples

      • Students create a class calendar, highlighting events and holidays that hold significance for them (K.3.2).
  • Civic Values

    • K.4. Broad Concept: Students identify and describe the events or people celebrated during U.S. national holidays and why Americans celebrate them (e.g., DC Emancipation Day, Columbus Day, Independence Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Flag Day). (P)

      Examples:

      • After listening to Martin’s Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., by Doreen Rappaport, students discuss why Dr. King championed civil rights. Students draw pictures of an important event from Dr. King’s life, and together they generate sentences about him. They create a class book from their work (K.4).
      • Students listen to George Washington’s Breakfast, by Jean Fritz, and Just Like Abraham Lincoln, by Bernard Waber—books that tell the story of the president as it relates to a modern day child. As a class, they collect photographs of Presidents Washington and Lincoln, including those that appear on the nickel, quarter, and one and five dollar bills. Students brainstorm facts about each president while the teacher lists those specifics under each photograph (K.4).
      • Students listen to Sarah Morton’s Day, by Kate Waters, and The Pilgrim’s First Thanksgiving, by Ann McGovern. Students then make a Venn diagram to compare life then to life today (K.4).
    • K.5. Broad Concept: Students identify important American symbols such as the American flag and its colors and shapes, the bald eagle, the Statue of Liberty, and the words of the Pledge of Allegiance. (P)

      Examples:

      • After reviewing pictures on a Web site or in an encyclopedia of U.S. flags over the course of U.S. history, students compare the original thirteen-star Betsy Ross flag to today’s flag, pointing out that the stars represent the current states, while the stripes represent the original colonies. They discuss how the number of stars has grown as states have been added to the Union (www.usflag.org/history/historicflags.html) (K.5).
      • Students listen to The Statue of Liberty, by Lucille Recht Penner and Jada Rowland. They talk about the importance of individual freedom in the United States and brainstorm ways in which we are free. They create a class poem based on these freedoms. Each student contributes one line beginning “We are free to ...” (K.5).
    • K.6. Broad Concept: Students retell stories that illustrate honesty, courage, friendship, respect, responsibility, and the wise or judicious exercise of authority, and they explain how the stories show these qualities.

      Students:

      1. Distinguish between fictional characters and real people in the school, the community, the nation, or internationally who are or were good leaders and good citizens, and explain the qualities that made them admirable (e.g., honesty, dependability, modesty, trustworthiness, or courageousness). (P, S)
      2. Identify family or community members who promote the welfare and safety of children and adults. (P, S)

      Examples

      • With the help of the school librarian, students create a display of books, newspaper clippings, and pictures on heroes and people who made (or make) a difference in people’s lives (e.g., presidents, civil rights advocates, local activists). Students discuss what makes a hero, clarifying that there are many different ways to be heroic (K.6.1).
      • Students bring in a photograph (or make a drawing) of a person who has made a difference in their own lives. As a class, each student presents his or her pictures and the reasons for their selections to their parents or another class. When appropriate, students come to school dressed as their hero (K.6.2).
  • Personal and Family Economics

    • K.7. Broad Concept: Students describe the way families produce, consume, and exchange goods and services in their community.

      Students:

      1. Understand different kinds of jobs that people do, including the work they do at home. (E)
      2. Tell why people work. (E)
      3. Identify what people buy with the money they earn. (E)
      4. Understand how family members, friends, or acquaintances use money directly or indirectly (e.g., credit card or check) to buy things they want. (E)
      5. Identify words that relate to work (e.g., jobs, money, buying, and selling). (E)

      Examples

      • Students ask their parents or guardians about the work they do at home or at their jobs. Students choose something to bring to class that symbolizes that work (e.g., a pack of seeds for a gardener, a piece of mail for a letter carrier, a planner for an administrative assistant, a model plane for a pilot, a family calendar for a homemaker). Once the items are all collected, students discuss how each type of work contributes to the well-being of the community (K.7.1).
      • Using circulars and advertisements for a variety of products, students work in small groups to choose items a family would need to buy for different rooms of their houses. For example, the kitchen might include food, appliances, china, and flatware. The family room might include furniture, electronics, and games (K.7.3).
      • In a play store, students use mock money and checks to make purchases with a limited amount of money. They discuss their choices and the differences between using cash and a check (K.7.4).

In addition to the standards for kindergarten through grade 2, students demonstrate the following intellectual, reasoning, reflection, and research skills:

  • Chronology and Cause and Effect

    1. Students place key events and people of the historical era they are studying in a chronological sequence and within a spatial context.
    2. Students correctly apply terms related to time (e.g., past, present, future, years, decades, centuries, millennia, epochs, and generations).
  • Geographic Skills

    1. Students use map and globe skills to determine the locations of places.
    2. Students identify the human and physical characteristics of the places they are studying.
    3. Students develop spatial ability by drawing sketch maps of the local community, regions of the United States, and major regions of the world.
  • Historical Research, Evidence, and Point of View

    1. Students analyze societies in terms of the following themes: military, political, economic, social, religious, and intellectual.
    2. Students pose relevant questions about events they encounter in historical documents.
    3. Students distinguish fact from fiction.
    4. Students use nontext primary and secondary sources, such as maps, charts, graphs, photographs, works of art, and technical charts.
 
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