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Idaho: 11th-Grade Standards

(Note: Between grades 9–12, Idaho students are expected to cover the following standards.)

  • American Government

    • Standard 1: History

      Students in American Government build an understanding of the cultural and social development of the United States.

      Goal 1.8:

      Build an understanding of the cultural and social development of the United States.
      Objective(s): By the end of American Government, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.G.1.1.1 Describe historical milestones that led to the creation of limited government in the United States, such as the Declaration of Independence (1776), Articles of Confederation (1781), state constitutions and charters, United States Constitution (1787), and the Bill of Rights (1791).
      • 9-12.G.1.1.2 Analyze important events responsible for bringing about political changes in the United States.
    • Standard 2: Geography

      Students in American Government explain how geography enables people to comprehend the relationships between people, places, and environments over time.

      Goal 2.5:

      Explain how geography enables people to comprehend the relationships between people, places, and environments over time.
      Objective(s): By the end of American Government, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.G.2.5.1 Analyze the impact of geography on the American political system, such as electoral politics and congressional redistricting.
    • Standard 3: Economics

      Students in American Government identify different influences on economic systems.

      Goal 3.3:

      Explain basic economic concepts.
      Objective(s): By the end of American Government, the student will be able to:

      • Analyze the economic impact of government policy.
    • Standard 4: Civics and Government

      Students in American Government build an understanding of the foundational principles of the American political system, the organization and formation of the American system of government, that all people in the United States have rights and assume responsibilities, and the evolution of democracy.

      Goal 4.1:

      Build an understanding of the foundational principles of the American political system. Objective(s): By the end of American Government, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.G.4.1.1 Describe the origins of constitutional law in western civilization, including the natural rights philosophy, Magna Carta (1215), common law, and the Bill of Rights (1689) in England.
      • 9-12.G.4.1.2 Analyze the essential ideals and objectives of the original organizing documents of the United States including the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution and Amendments.
      • 9-12.G.4.1.3 Explain the central principles of the United States governmental system including written constitution, popular sovereignty, limited government, separation of powers, majority rule with minority rights, and federalism.

      Goal 4.2:

      Build an understanding of the organization and formation of the American system of government.
      Objective(s): By the end of American Government, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.G.4.2.1 Identify the three branches of federal government, their powers, and responsibilities.
      • 9-12.G.4.2.2 Explain the functions, powers, interactions, and relationships among federal, state, local, and tribal governments.
      • 9-12.G.4.2.3 Analyze and explain sovereignty and the treaty/trust relationship the United States has with American Indian tribes with emphasis on Idaho, such as hunting and fishing rights, and land leasing.
      • 9-12.G.4.2.4 Analyze the role of political parties and other political organizations and their impact on the American system of government.
      • 9-12.G.4.2.5 Explain the electoral process at each level of government.
      • 9-12.G.4.2.6 Compare different forms of government, such as presidential with parliamentary, unitary with federal, democracy with dictatorship.

      Goal 4.3:

      Build an understanding that all people in the United States have rights and assume responsibilities.
      Objective(s): By the end of American Government, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.G.4.3.1 Explain the ways in which individuals become citizens and distinguish among obligations, responsibilities, and rights.
      • 9-12.G.4.3.2 Explain the implications of dual citizenship with regard to American Indians.
      • 9-12.G.4.3.3 Identify the ways in which citizens can participate in the political process at the local, state, and national level.
      • 9-12.G.4.3.4 Analyze and evaluate decisions about rights of individuals in landmark cases of the United States Supreme Court, including Gideon v. Wainwright, Miranda v. Arizona.

      Goal 4.4:

      Build an understanding of the evolution of democracy.
      Objective(s): By the end of American Government, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.G.4.4.1 Analyze the struggles for the extension of civil rights.
      • 9-12.G.4.4.2 Analyze and evaluate states’ rights disputes past and present.
      • 9-12.G.4.4.3 Provide and evaluate examples of the role of leadership in the changing relationship among the branches of American government.
      • 9-12.G.4.4.4 Discuss how the interpretation and application of the United States Constitution has evolved.
    • Standard 5: Global Perspectives

      Students in American Government build an understanding of multiple perspectives and global interdependence.

      Goal 5.1:

      Build an understanding of multiple perspectives and global interdependence.
      Objective(s): By the end of American Government, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.G.5.1.1 Discuss the mutual impact of ideas, issues, and policies among nations, including environmental, economic, and humanitarian.
      • 9-12.G.5.1.2 Describe the characteristics of United States foreign policy and how it has been created and implemented over time.
      • 9-12.G.5.1.3 Identify and evaluate the role of the United States in international organizations and agreements, such as the United Nations, NAFTA, and humanitarian organizations.
  • Economics

    • Standard 1: History

      Students in Economics analyze the political, social, and economic responses to industrialization and technological innovations in the development of the United States.

      Goal 1.4:

      Analyze the political, social, and economic responses to industrialization and technological innovations in the development of the United States.
      Objective(s): By the end of Economics, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.E.1.4.1 Analyze the impact of events such as wars, industrialization, and technological developments on the business cycle.
    • Standard 2: Geography

      Students in Economics analyze the human and physical characteristics of different places and regions.

      Goal 2.4:

      Analyze the human and physical characteristics of different places and regions.
      Objective(s): By the end of Economics, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.E.2.4.1 Explain how the factors of production are distributed among geographic regions and how this influences economic growth.
    • Standard 3: Economics

      Students in Economics explain basic economic concepts, identify different influences on economic systems, analyze the different types of economic institutions, and explain the concepts of good personal finance.

      Goal 3.1:

      Explain basic economic concepts.
      Objective(s): By the end of Economics, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.E.3.1.1 Define scarcity and explain its implications in decision making.
      • 9-12.E.3.1.2 Identify ways in which the interaction of all buyers and sellers influence prices.
      • 9-12.E.3.1.3 Identify how incentives determine what is produced and distributed in a competitive market system.
      • 9-12.E.3.1.4 Describe the factors of production.
      • 9-12.E.3.1.5 Create and interpret graphs that model economic concepts.

      Goal 3.2:

      Identify different influences on economic systems.
      Objective(s): By the end of Economics, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.E.3.2.1 Compare and contrast the characteristics of different economic systems and economic philosophies.
      • 9-12.E.3.2.2 Explain and illustrate the impact of economic policies and decisions made by governments, businesses, and individuals.

      Goal 3.3:

      Analyze the different types of economic institutions.
      Objective(s): By the end of Economics, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.E.3.3.1 Explain the characteristics of various types of business and market structures.
      • 9-12.E.3.3.2 Describe the elements of entrepreneurship and successful businesses.
      • 9-12.E.3.3.3 Identify the role of the financial markets and institutions.
      • 9-12.E.3.3.4 Explain the purposes of labor unions.
      • 9-12.E.3.3.5 Explain the difference between monetary policy and fiscal policy.
      • 9-12.E.3.3.6 Analyze the various parts of the business cycle and its effect on the economy.

      Goal 3.4:

      Explain the concepts of good personal finance.
      Objective(s): By the end of Economics, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.E.3.4.1 Examine and apply the elements of responsible personal fiscal management, such as budgets, interest, investment, savings, credit, and debt.
      • 9-12.E.3.4.2 Identify and evaluate sources and examples of consumers’ responsibilities and rights.
      • 9-12.E.3.4.3 Discuss the impact of taxation as applied to personal finances.
    • Standard 4: Civics and Government

      Students in Economics build an understanding of the organization and formation of the American system of government.

      Goal 4.2:

      Build an understanding of the organization and formation of the American system of government.
      Objective(s): By the end of Economics, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.E.4.2.1 Explain the basic functions of government in a mixed economic system.
      • 9-12.E.4.2.2 Identify laws and policies adopted in the United States to regulate competition.
    • Standard 5: Global Perspectives

      Students in Economics build an understanding of multiple perspectives and global interdependence.

      Goal 5.1:

      Build an understanding of multiple perspectives and global interdependence.
      Objective(s): By the end of Economics, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.E.5.1.1 Describe the involvement of the United States in international economic organizations and treaties, such as GATT, IMF, and the WTO.
      • 9-12.E.5.1.2 Analyze global economic interdependence and competition.
      • 9-12.E.5.1.3 Apply economic concepts to explain the role of imports/exports both nationally and internationally.
  • U.S. History I

    • Standard 1: History

      Students in U.S. History I build an understanding of the cultural and social development of the United States, trace the role of migration and immigration of people in the development of the United States, identify the role of American Indians in the development of the United States, analyze the political, social, and economic responses to industrialization and technological innovations in the development of the United States, and trace the role of exploration and expansion in the development of the United States.

      Goal 1.1:

      Build an understanding of the cultural and social development of the United States.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.1.1.1 Compare and contrast the different cultural and social influences that emerged in the North American colonies.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.1.2 Describe the experiences of culturally, ethnically, and racially different groups existing as part of American society prior to the Civil War.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.1.3 Analyze the common traits, beliefs, and characteristics that unite the United States as a nation and a society.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.1.4 Discuss the causes and effects of various compromises and conflicts in American history such as the American Revolution, Civil War and Reconstruction.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.1.5 Compare and contrast early cultures and settlements that existed in North America prior to European contact.

      Goal 1.2:

      Trace the role of migration and immigration of people in the development of the United States.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.1.2.1 Analyze the religious, political, and economic motives of European immigrants who came to North America.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.2.2 Explain the motives and consequences for slavery and other forms of involuntary immigration to North America.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.2.3 Analyze the concept of Manifest Destiny and its impact on American Indians and the development of the United States.

      Goal 1.3:

      Identify the role of American Indians in the development of the United States.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.1.3.1 Trace federal policies and treaties such as removal, reservations, and allotment throughout history that have impacted contemporary American Indians.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.3.2 Explain how and why events may be interpreted differently according to the points of view of participants and observers.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.3.3 Discuss the resistance of American Indians to assimilation.

      Goal 1.4:

      Analyze the political, social, and economic responses to industrialization and technological innovations in the development of the United States.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.1.4.1 Explain the consequences of scientific and technological inventions and changes on the social and economic lives of the people in the development the United States.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.4.2 Explain how the development of various modes of transportation increased economic prosperity and promoted national unity.

      Goal 1.5:

      Trace the role of exploration and expansion in the development of the United States.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.1.5.1 Examine the development of diverse cultures in what is now the United States.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.5.2 Identify significant countries and their roles and motives in the European exploration of the Americas.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.5.3 Describe and analyze the interactions between native peoples and the European explorers.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.5.4 Summarize the major events in the European settlement of North America from Jamestown to the end of the 18th century.
      • 6-12.USH1.1.5.5 Identify the United States territorial expansion between 1801 and 1861 and explain internal and external conflicts.
    • Standard 2: Geography

      Students in U.S. History I analyze the spatial organizations of people, places, and environment on the earth’s surface, explain how human actions modify the physical environment and how physical systems affect human activity and living conditions, and trace the migration and settlement of human populations on the earth’s surface.

      Goal 2.1:

      Analyze the spatial organizations of people, places, and environment on the earth’s surface.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.2.1.1 Develop and interpret different kinds of maps, globes, graphs, charts, databases and models.

      Goal 2.2:

      Explain how human actions modify the physical environment and how physical systems affect human activity and living conditions.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.2.2.1 Analyze ways in which the physical environment affected political and economic development.

      Goal 2.3:

      Trace the migration and settlement of human populations on the earth’s surface.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.2.3.1 Describe Pre-Columbian migration to the Americas.
      • 6-12.USH1.2.3.2 Illustrate westward migration across North America.
    • Standard 3: Economics

      Students in U.S. History I explain basic economic concepts, identify different influences on economic systems, and analyze the different types of economic institutions.

      Goal 3.1:

      Explain basic economic concepts.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.3.1.1 Describe the economic characteristics of mercantilism.
      • 6-12.USH1.3.1.2 Compare the economic development of the North with the South.

      Goal 3.2:

      Identify different influences on economic systems.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.3.2.1 Describe the emergence and evolution of a market economy.
      • 6-12.USH1.3.2.2 Analyze the role of government policy in the early economic development of the United States.

      Goal 3.3:

      Analyze the different types of economic institutions.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.3.3.1 Evaluate the role of financial institutions in the economic development of the United States.
    • Standard 4: Civics and Government

      Students in U.S. History I build an understanding of the foundational principles of the American political system, the organization and formation of the American system of government, that all people in the United States have rights and assume responsibilities, and the evolution of democracy.

      Goal 4.1:

      Build an understanding of the foundational principles of the American political system.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.4.1.1 Trace the development of constitutional democracy in the United States, such as the Mayflower Compact, colonial assemblies, Bacon’s Rebellion.
      • 6-12.USH1.4.1.2 Identify fundamental values and principles as expressed in basic documents such as the Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution.
      • 6-12.USH1.4.1.3 Evaluate issues in which fundamental values and principles are in conflict, such as between liberty and equality, individual interests and the common good, and majority rule and minority protections.

      Goal 4.2:

      Build an understanding of the organization and formation of the American system of government.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.4.2.1 Explain how the executive, legislative, and judicial powers are distributed and shared among the three branches of national government.
      • 6-12.USH1.4.2.2 Explain how and why powers are distributed and shared between national and state governments in a federal system.

      Goal 4.3:

      Build an understanding that all people in the United States have rights and assume responsibilities.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.4.3.1 Provide and evaluate examples of social and political leadership in early American history.
      • 6-12.USH1.4.3.2 Describe ways in which citizens participated in early American public life.

      Goal 4.4:

      Build an understanding of the evolution of democracy.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.4.4.1 Describe the role of gender, race, ethnicity, religion, and national origin on the development of individual/political rights.
    • Standard 5: Global Perspectives

      Students in U.S. History I build an understanding of multiple perspectives and global interdependence.

      Goal 5.1:

      Build an understanding of multiple perspectives and global interdependence.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History I, the student will be able to:

      • 6-12.USH1.5.1.1 Explain the significance of principle policies and events in the United States’ relations with the world, such as the War of 1812, Monroe Doctrine, and Mexican and Spanish American Wars.
      • 6-12.USH1.5.1.2 Evaluate the major foreign policy positions that have characterized the United States’ relations with the world, such as isolationism and imperialism.
      • 6-12.USH1.5.1.3 Analyze how national interest shapes foreign policy.
  • U.S. History II

    • Standard 1: History

      Students in U.S. History II build an understanding of the cultural and social development of the United States, trace the role of migration and immigration of people in the development of the United States, identify the role of American Indians in the development of the United States, analyze the political, social, and economic responses to industrialization and technological innovations in the development of the United States, and trace the role of exploration and expansion in the development of the United States.

      Goal 1.1:

      Build an understanding of the cultural and social development of the United States. Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.1.1.1 Analyze ways in which language, literature, the arts, traditions, beliefs, values and behavior patterns of diverse cultures have enriched American society.
      • 9-12.USH2.1.1.2 Discuss the causes and effects of various compromises and conflicts in American history.
      • 9-12.USH2.1.1.3 Analyze significant movements for social change.

      Goal 1.2:

      Trace the role of migration and immigration of people in the development of the United States.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.1.2.1 Identify motives for continued immigration to the United States.
      • 9-12.USH2.1.2.2 Analyze the changes in the political, social, and economic conditions of immigrant groups.
      • 9-12.USH2.1.2.3 Discuss the causes and effects of 20th century migration and settlement patterns.

      Goal 1.3:

      Identify the role of American Indians in the development of the United States.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.1.3.1 Trace federal policies such as Indian citizenship, Indian Reorganization Act, Termination, AIM, and self determination throughout history that have impacted contemporary American Indians.
      • 9-12.USH2.1.3.2 Discuss the resistance of American Indians to assimilation.
      • 9-12.USH2.1.3.3 Explain the influences of American Indians to the history and culture of the United States.

      Goal 1.4:

      Analyze the political, social, and economic responses to industrialization and technological innovations in the development of the United States. Objective(s): By the end of World History and Civilization, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.1.4.1 Explain the factors that contributed to the rise of industrialization in the 19th century.
      • 9-12.USH2.1.4.2 Describe the economic responses to industrialization and the emergence of the American labor movement.
      • 9-12.USH2.1.4.3 Analyze the political and social responses to industrialization.
      • 9-12.USH2.1.4.4 Identify and analyze the causes of the Great Depression and its effects upon American society.
      • 9-12.USH2.1.4.5 Account for and define the shift from the industrial society at the beginning of the 20th century to the technological society at the end of the 20th century.

      Goal 1.5:

      Trace the role of exploration and expansion in the development of the United States.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.1.5.1 Describe the factors that contributed to the expansion of the United States.
    • Standard 2: Geography

      Students in U.S. History II analyze the spatial organizations of people, places, and environment on the earth’s surface, and explain how human actions modify the physical environment and how physical systems affect human activity and living conditions.

      Goal 2.1:

      Analyze the spatial organizations of people, places, and environment on the earth’s surface.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.2.1.1 Develop and interpret different kinds of maps, globes, graphs, charts, databases and models.

      Goal 2.2:

      Explain how human actions modify the physical environment and how physical systems affect human activity and living conditions.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.2.2.1 Analyze ways in which the physical environment affected political and economic development.
    • Standard 3: Economics

      Students in U.S. History II explain basic economic concepts, identify different influences on economic systems, analyze the different types of economic institutions, and explain the concepts of good personal finance.

      Goal 3.1:

      Explain basic economic concepts.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.3.1.1 Describe the emergence of the modern corporation.
      • 9-12.USH2.3.1.2 Describe the development of a consumer economy.
      • 9-12.USH2.3.1.3 Analyze the role of the modern United States in the global economy.

      Goal 3.2:

      Identify different influences on economic systems.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.3.2.1 Analyze the role of government policy in the economic development of the modern United States.

      Goal 3.3:

      Analyze the different types of economic institutions.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.3.3.1 Evaluate the role of financial institutions in the economic development of the United States.

      Goal 3.4:

      Explain the concepts of good personal finance.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.3.4.1 Analyze how economic conditions affect personal finance.
    • Standard 4: Civics and Government

      Students in U.S. History II build an understanding of the organization and formation of the American system of government, build an understanding that all people in the United States have rights and assume responsibilities, and build an understanding of the evolution of democracy.

      Goal 4.2:

      Build an understanding of the organization and formation of the American system of government.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.4.2.1 Analyze the relationship between the three federal branches of government.

      Goal 4.3:

      Build an understanding of the organization and formation of the American system of government.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.4.3.1 Identify the impact of landmark United States Supreme Court cases, including Plessy v. Ferguson and Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka.
      • 9-12.USH2.4.3.2 Provide and evaluate examples of social and political leadership in American history.

      Goal 4.4:

      Build an understanding of the evolution of democracy.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.4.4.1 Trace the development and expansion of political, civil, and economic rights.
    • Standard 5: Global Perspectives

      Students in U.S. History II build an understanding of multiple perspectives and global interdependence.

      Goal 5.1:

      Build an understanding of multiple perspectives and global interdependence.
      Objective(s): By the end of U.S. History II, the student will be able to:

      • 9-12.USH2.5.1.1 Compare competing belief systems of the 20th century, including communism, totalitarianism, isolationism, and internationalism.
      • 9-12.USH2.5.1.2 Trace the major foreign policy positions that have characterized the United States’ relations with the world in the 20th century.
      • 9-12.USH2.5.1.3 Explain the significance of principal events in the United States’ relations with the world, such as World Wars I and II, formation of the United Nations, Marshall Plan, NATO, Korean and Vietnam Wars, end of the Cold War, and interventions in Latin America and the Middle East.
      • 9-12.USH2.5.1.4 Explain how and why the United States assumed the role of world leader after World War II and analyze its leadership role in the world today.
 
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