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West Virginia: 1st-Grade Standards

First grade Social Studies explores the role of the citizen in the schools, family and community. Students learn responsibilities, privileges and rights, patriotic traditions, symbols, functions of money and the connection of the past to the present. Conflict resolution, consumer roles and good safety practices will be introduced. Students recognize geographic features and identify regions. A variety of graphic skills will be incorporated, including graphs, charts and timelines. Economic concepts of basic needs and community occupations will be explored. The objectives for elementary West Virginia Social Studies may be integrated throughout the K-3 curriculum. The West Virginia Standards for 21st Century Learning include the following components: 21st Century Content Standards and Objectives and 21st Century Learning Skills and Technology Tools. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and content standards and objectives.

Social Studies Standard 1: Citizenship

SS.S.01.01/Students will:

  • characterize and model good citizenship by building social networks of reciprocity and trustworthiness (Civic Dispositions).
  • model a respect of symbols, ideas and concepts of the United States and analyze the roles of significant individuals (Respect for People, Events, and Symbols).
  • develop and employ the civic skills necessary for effective citizenship by using criteria to make judgments, arrive at and defend positions and evaluate the validity of the positions or data (Evaluation Skills).
  • develop the participatory skills of interacting, monitoring and influencing that are essential for informed, effective and responsible citizenship, including participation in civic life to shape public policy (Participatory Skills).
  • recognize and communicate the responsibilities, privileges and rights of United States citizens (Civic Life).
  • SS.PD.1.1/Performance Descriptors
    • Novice—Students are able to:
      • list examples of civic responsibility
      • give an example of volunteering locally
      • define good citizenship
    • Partial Mastery—Students are able to:
      • give examples for civic responsibilities, privileges, and rights
      • identify a local problem define volunteerism
      • discuss behavior that demonstrates good citizenship
    • Mastery—Students are able to:
      • explain various civic responsibilities, privileges and rights, and defend a position as to why civic responsibility is important
      • propose solutions to a local problem and investigate opportunities for volunteering locally
      • model behavior that demonstrates good citizenship
    • Above Mastery—Students are able to:
      • categorize examples of civic responsibilities, privileges, and rights
      • research local problems, choose one, and propose a solution
      • defend reasons for being a good citizen
    • Distinguished—Students are able to:
      • discriminate between civic responsibilities, privileges, and rights and give examples of each
      • choose a local problem, recommend a solution, and develop a plan to implement the solution
      • assess characteristics of citizens and determine which ones demonstrate good citizenship
  • Objectives / Students will:
    • SS.O.01.01.01: express opinions and accept opinions of others in solving problems and/or resolving conflicts.
    • SS.O.01.01.02: illustrate examples of honesty, caring and trustworthiness in the home and at school.
    • SS.O.01.01.03: participate in developing classroom rules and discussing the consequences of breaking rules.
    • SS.O.01.01.04: demonstrate respect and responsibility for self and others’ materials and belongings.
    • SS.O.01.01.05: be given the opportunity to recite the Pledge of Allegiance, participate in patriotic singing and celebrate national holidays and discuss their significance.
    • SS.O.01.01.06: discuss the importance of volunteerism and participate in school/community projects.
    • SS.O.01.01.07: demonstrate and give examples of appropriate behavior in dangerous situations (e.g., fire, poison, traffic, strangers and drugs).

Social Studies Standard 2: Civics/Government

SS.S.01.02 / Students will:

  • examine and analyze the purposes and basic principles of the United States government (Purposes of Government).
  • outline and evaluate and analyze the origins and meaning of the principles, ideals and core democratic values expressed in the foundational documents of the United States (Ideals of United States Democracy).
  • examine and distinguish the structure, function and responsibilities of governments and the allocation of power at the local, state and national levels (United States Government and Politics).
  • analyze how the world is organized politically and compare the role and relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs (United States Government and World Affairs).
  • SS.PD.1.2 / Performance Descriptors
    • Novice—Students are able to:
      • define local, county, and state government
      • name important holidays and local celebrations of West Virginia
      • recognize and are given opportunity to recite the State Song or State Motto
    • Partial Mastery—Students are able to:
      • state a function or role of government at the local, county, and state level
      • recognize important holidays, celebrations and people of West Virginia
      • know what a State Motto and State Song are and are given opportunity to recite each
    • Mastery—Students are able to:
      • compare and contrast roles and functions of the government at the local, county and state levels
      • identify important state symbols, holidays, celebrations and people
      • recognize and are given the opportunity to recite the State Motto and State Song
    • Above Mastery—Students are able to:
      • evaluate the importance of roles or functions of local and county levels compared to those of the state level of government
      • describe the importance of state symbols, holidays, celebrations, and people
      • discuss the purpose of the State Motto and State Song and are given the opportunity to recite each
    • Distinguished—Students are able to:
      • compare roles and functions of the state government to the roles and function of the national and discuss how they relate to each other
      • select important state symbols, holidays, celebrations, or people and examine the role of each in the state government
      • relate the event(s) leading to the development of the State Motto and State Song and are given the opportunity to recite each
  • Objectives / Students will:
    • SS.O.01.02.01: describe, discuss and practice various group roles (e.g., group leader, recorder, reporter, collector) in the classroom.
    • SS.O.01.02.02: identify the three levels of government (local, state and federal).
    • SS.O.01.02.03: identify the President and Governor and other government leaders and describe their roles and explain the need for authority figures.
    • SS.O.01.02.04: explain the difference between rules and laws, establish criteria for determining if a rule or law is fair and identify the consequences for breaking rules.

Social Studies Standard 3: Economics

SS.S.01.03 / Students will:

  • analyze the role of economic choices in scarcity, supply and demand, resource allocation, decision-making, voluntary exchange and trade-offs (Choices).
  • research, critique and evaluate the roles of private and public institutions in the economy (Institutions).
  • compare and contrast various economic systems and analyze their impact on individual citizens (Economic Systems).
  • illustrate how the factors of production impact the United States economic systems (Factors of Production).
  • analyze the elements of competition and how they impact the economy (Competition).
  • examine and evaluate the interdependence of global economies (Global Economics).
  • SS.PD.1.3 / Performance Descriptors
    • Novice—Students are able to:
      • identify occupations of people in West Virginia
      • list natural resources of West Virginia and tell how they are important to the state’s economy
    • Partial Mastery—Students are able to:
      • give examples of occupations of people in West Virginia
      • give examples of natural resources and recognize geographic features that affect the state’s economy
    • Mastery—Students are able to:
      • categorize the major occupations of people in West Virginia
      • locate and provide examples of the natural resources and geographic features of West Virginia and discuss their effect upon the state’s economic development
    • Above Mastery—Students are able to:
      • compare major occupations of people in West Virginia
      • research and examine how natural resources and geographic features effect the state’s economic development and contribute to the economic well-being of its residents
    • Distinguished—Students are able to:
      • compare major occupations of people in West Virginia and evaluate their importance to the state
      • assess the importance of the state’s natural resources to the nation’s economy and summarize how geographic features have an effect upon the state’s economic development
  • Objectives / Students will:
    • SS.O.01.03.01: recognize that all people share the same basic needs and choose from among needs and wants and predict the consequences of those choices.
    • SS.O.01.03.02: demonstrate the exchange of goods and services (using money or other goods and services).
    • SS.O.01.03.03: recognize the characteristics of occupations in the community.

Social Studies Standard 4: Geography

SS.S.01.04 / Students will:

  • interpret and choose maps, globes and other geographic tools to categorize and organize information about personal directions, people, places, and environments (The World in Spatial Terms).
  • examine the physical and human characteristics of place and explain how the lives of people are rooted in places and regions (Places and Regions).
  • analyze the physical processes that shape the earth's surface and create, sustain and modify the cultural and natural environment (Physical Systems).
  • analyze and illustrate how the earth is shaped by the movement of people and their activities (Human Systems).
  • analyze the interaction of society with the environment (Environment and Society).
  • point out geographic perspective and tools and assess techniques available for geographic study (Uses of Geography).
  • SS.PD.1.4 / Performance Descriptors
    • Novice—Students are able to:
      • state West Virginia as a place where they live and identify the mountains as a major geographic feature of the state
      • demonstrate or show cardinal directions on a map
      • list the seasons and tell how they feel when it is cold or hot and what kinds of activities can be done during these times
      • name at least one basic natural resource
    • Partial Mastery—Students are able to:
      • understand the relationship of West Virginia to the United States and identify the Ohio River and Appalachian Mountains as major geographic features of their state
      • draw a simple map and show cardinal directions and symbols on their map
      • list the days of the week and the seasons and tell how climate/weather affects the types of work people do
      • list two or three common natural resources.
    • Mastery—Students are able to:
      • locate West Virginia and United States on a globe or map and locate major geographic features on a United States map
      • construct and interpret simple maps using cardinal directions, location, scale, and symbols in a legend
      • sequence days, months, and seasons of the year and relate how climate and weather affect people lives
      • give examples of basic natural resources
    • Above Mastery—Students are able to:
      • locate surrounding states of West Virginia and illustrate examples of major geographic features found on a United States map
      • construct a simple map with a legend, cardinal directions, and map symbols
      • can state the day, month, or season following each designated example in sequence
      • discuss effects of climate/weather on people’s lives and classify examples of basic natural resources
    • Distinguished—Students are able to:
      • locate surrounding states of West Virginia and surrounding countries of the United States and compare two or more examples of each major geographic feature on a United States map
      • construct a simple map to scale with a legend using cardinal directions and map symbols
      • given a designated day, month, or season, students can relate the names of other days, months, or seasons in the sequence before and after
      • compare climate/weather in different areas of the United States and compare uses of different natural resources
  • Objectives / Students will:
    • SS.O.01.04.01: construct a simple map of a familiar area (such as the school) incorporating cardinal directions and map symbols.
    • SS.O.01.04.02: locate and identify the following using a globe and world map: (1)West Virginia (2)United States (3)geographic features
    • SS.O.01.04.03: sequence the seasons of the year, days of the week and months.
    • SS.O.01.04.04:give examples of basic natural resources.
    • SS.O.01.04.05: recognize and relate how climate/weather affects the way people live (e.g., food, clothing, shelter, recreation).
    • SS.O.01.04.06: construct and interpret simple maps using cardinal directions, locations, a scale and symbols in a legend.

Social Studies Standard 5: History

SS.S.01.05 / Students will:

  • organize, analyze and compare historical events, distinguish cause-effect relationships, theorize alternative actions and outcomes, and anticipate future application (Chronology).
  • use the processes and resources of historical inquiry to develop appropriate questions, gather and examine evidence, compare, analyze and interpret historical data (Skills and Application).
  • examine, analyze and synthesize historical knowledge of major events, individuals, cultures and the humanities in West Virginia, the United States, and the world (Culture and Humanities).
  • use historical knowledge to analyze local, state, national and global interdependence (Interpretation and Evaluation).
  • examine political institutions and theories that have developed and changed over time; and research and cite reasons for development and change (Political Institutions).
  • SS.PD.1.5 / Performance Descriptors
    • Novice—Students are able to:
      • recognize that communities change over time
      • discuss historical data from various sources
      • match characteristics of the past and contributions of heroic people
      • describe cultural differences to build understanding and empathy
      • collect family historical information through two generations
      • discuss the different types of families
    • Partial Mastery—Students are able to:
      • discuss the ways in which communities change over time
      • participate in the organization of historical data
      • describe characteristics of the past and contributions of heroic people
      • understand cultural differences to build understanding and empathy
      • collect family historical information through two generations and examine the comparisons to present-day living
      • give examples of different types of families
    • Mastery—Students are able to:
      • give examples of ways communities change over time
      • participate in the collection and organization of historical data
      • identify characteristics of the past and contributions of heroic people
      • investigate cultural differences to build understanding and empathy
      • collect family historical information through two generations and make comparisons to present-day living
      • compare and contrast different types of families
    • Above Mastery—Students are able to:
      • collect information about the ways in which communities change over time
      • organize and classify historical information
      • research characteristics of the past and contributions of heroic people
      • contrast/compare cultural differences to build understanding and empathy
      • research family historical information through three generations and make comparisons to present-day living
      • compare and contrast different types of families, listing the characteristics of each
    • Distinguished—Students are able to:
      • research changes in communities over time
      • evaluate and prioritize historical information
      • categorize characteristics of the past and compare/contrast contributions of heroic people
      • make inferences from cultural differences to support understanding and empathy
      • defend family historical information through three generations using primary sources and make comparisons to present-day living
      • compare and contrast different types of families, summarizing by categories the characteristics of each
  • Objectives / Students will:
    • SS.O.01.05.01: give examples of ways communities change over time (e.g., landscape, buildings, jobs, population).
    • SS.O.01.05.02: collect information to contrast family history through two generations (parents, grandparents) and make comparisons to present-day.
    • SS.O.01.05.03: identify characteristics of the past and contributions of heroic people using sources such as stories, folk tales, pictures, poems, songs, legends, holdings and customs, and organize historical data.
    • SS.O.01.05.04: investigate cultural differences through celebrations, holidays and family traditions to build empathy and understanding for individuals and groups.
    • SS.O.01.05.05: compare and contrast different types of families (e.g., single parent, extended, multi-generational).

Social Studies Standard 6: Reading

SS.S.01.06 / Students will:

  • use the five reading components (phonemic awareness, phonics, background knowledge/vocabulary, high frequency word/fluency, comprehension and writing) in their acquisition of social studies knowledge, insuring a foundation of college readiness in this genre.
  • recognize main ideas and supporting details to locate basic facts (e.g., names, dates, events).
  • distinguish relationships among people, ideas, and events.
  • recognize cause-effect relationships in content passages.
  • outline sequences of events.
  • summarize events and ideas. Infer main idea or purpose of content.
  • draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas, and events.
  • write and edit organized texts of various genres to insure that information is clearly understood.

Note: By the completion of fourth grade, West Virginia students are also expected to master the following standards.

Elementary West Virginia Studies explore historic, geographic, economic and civic concepts. These objectives shall be appropriately integrated into the kindergarten—fourth grade curriculum. Teachers introduce students to geographic places and regions. The relationship among geographic settlement patterns and economic development of West Virginia will be examined in this course. Students participate in a variety of activities enabling them to identify research and discuss the cultural heritage of the various groups who settled West Virginia. The course content reflects West Virginia’s unique characteristics as well as its national and global relationships. The West Virginia Standards for 21st Century Learning include the following components: 21st Century Content Standards and Objectives and 21st Century Learning Skills and Technology Tools. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and content standards and objectives.

Social Studies Standard 1: Citizenship

SS.S.WV.1 / Students will:

  • characterize and model good citizenship by building social networks of reciprocity and trustworthiness (Civic Dispositions).
  • model a respect of symbols, ideas and concepts of the United States and analyze the roles of significant individuals (Respect for People, Events, and Symbols).
  • develop and employ the civic skills necessary for effective citizenship by using criteria to make judgments, arrive at and defend positions and evaluate the validity of the positions of data (Evaluation Skills).
  • develop the participatory skills of interacting, monitoring and influencing that are essential for informed, effective and responsible citizenship, including participation in civic life to shape public policy (Participatory Skills).
  • recognize and communicate the responsibilities, privileges and rights of United States citizens (Civic Life).
  • SS.PD.WV.1 / Performance Descriptors
    • Novice—Students are able to:
      • list examples of civic responsibility;
      • give an example of volunteering locally; and
      • define good citizenship.
    • Partial Mastery—Students are able to:
      • give examples for civic responsibilities, privileges, and rights;
      • identify a local problem define volunteerism;
      • discuss behavior that demonstrates good citizenship.
    • Mastery—Students are able to:
      • categorize and give examples of civic responsibilities, privileges, and rights;
      • propose solutions to a local problem volunteer to help;
      • model behavior that demonstrates good citizenship.
    • Above Mastery—Students are able to:
      • explain the importance of civic responsibilities, privileges and rights;
      • research local problems, choose one, and propose a solution;
      • defend reasons for being a good citizen.
    • Distinguished—Students are able to:
      • summarize the differences between civic responsibilities, privileges, and rights;
      • choose a local problem and develop a plan to implement a solution;
      • assess characteristics of good citizenship.
  • Objectives / Students will:
    • SS.O.WV.1.1: explain various civic responsibilities, privileges and rights (e.g., the act of voting as a West Virginia citizen).
    • SS.O.WV.1.2: propose solutions and investigate opportunities for public volunteerism concerning a local problem.
    • SS.O.K.1.3: model the behavior that shows how students are citizens of their classroom, community, state, and nation.
    • SS.O.K.1.4: take and defend a position as to why fulfilling one’s civic responsibility is important.

Social Studies Standard 2: Civics/Government

SS.S.WV.2 / Students will:

  • examine and analyze the purposes and basic principles of the United States government (Purposes of Government).
  • outline and evaluate and analyze the origins and meanings of the principles, ideals, and core democratic values expressed in the foundational documents of the United States (Ideals of United States Democracy).
  • examine and distinguish the structure, function, and responsibilities of governments and the allocation of power at the local, state and national levels (United States Government and Politics).
  • analyze how the world is organized politically and compare the role and relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs (United States Government and World Affairs).
  • SS.PD.WV.2 / Performance Descriptors

    • Novice—Students are able to:
      • define local, county, and state government;
      • name important holidays and local celebrations of West Virginia; and
      • identify and are given opportunity to recite the State Song or State Motto.
    • Partial Mastery—Students are able to:
      • state a role or function of government at the local, county, and state level;
      • discuss important holidays, local celebrations and people of West Virginia; and
      • define and are given the opportunity to recite the State Motto and State Song.
    • Mastery—Students are able to:
      • compare and contrast roles and functions of the government at the local, county and state levels;
      • identify and describe important state symbols, holidays, celebrations and people; and
      • explain and are given the opportunity to recite the State Motto and State Song.
    • Above Mastery—Students are able to:
      • evaluate the importance of roles or functions of local and county levels compared to those of the state level of government;
      • analyze the importance of state symbols, holidays, celebrations, and people; and
      • discuss the purpose of the State Motto and State Song and are given the opportunity to recite each.
    • Distinguished—Students are able to:
      • compare roles and functions of the state government to the roles and function of the national and discuss how they relate to each other;
      • choose important state symbols, holidays, celebrations, or people and summarize their roles; and
      • explain event(s) leading to the development of the State Motto and State Song and are given the opportunity to recite each.
  • Objectives / Students will:
    • SS.O.WV.2.1: identify state symbols, the state capital, celebrations, holidays, famous West Virginians, and the title of the elected leader (the Governor) of the state government.
    • SS.O.WV.2.2: recognize and be given the opportunity to recite the State Motto and sing the State Song.
    • SS.O.WV.2.3: compare and contrast the roles and functions of the government (e.g., legislative, executive, judicial branches) at the local, county and state levels.

Social Studies Standard 3: Economics

SS.S.K.03 / Students will:

  • analyze the role of economic choices in scarcity, supply and demand, resource allocation, decision-making, voluntary exchange and trade-offs (Choices).
  • research, critique and evaluate the roles of private and public institutions in the economy (Institutions).
  • compare and contrast various economic systems and analyze their impact on individual citizens (Economic Systems).
  • illustrate how the factors of production impact the United States economic systems (Factors of Production).
  • analyze the elements of competition and how they impact the economy (Competition).
  • examine and evaluate the interdependence of global economies (Global Economics).
  • SS.PD.WV.3 / Performance Descriptors
    • Novice—Students are able to:
      • identify occupations of people in West Virginia; and
      • list natural resources and recognize geographic features and tell how they are important to the state’s economy.
    • Partial Mastery—Students are able to:
      • give examples of occupations of people in West Virginia; and
      • give examples of natural resources and identify the geographic features that affect the state’s economy.
    • Mastery—Students are able to:
      • categorize major occupations of people in West Virginia; and
      • research the natural resources and geographic features of West Virginia and discuss their effect upon the state’s economic development.
    • Above Mastery—Students are able to:
      • compare major occupations of people in West Virginia; and
      • explain how natural resources and geographic features effect the state’s economic development and contribute to the economic well-being of its residents.
    • Distinguished—Students are able to:
      • critique the importance of major occupations of people in West Virginia; and
      • assess the importance of the state’s natural resources and geographic features to its economic development and the economy of the nation.
  • Objectives / Students will:
    • SS.O.WV.3.1: locate and give examples of the natural resources and geographic features of West Virginia and show their effect upon the economic development of the state.
    • SS.O.WV.3.2: categorize the major occupations of people in the private and public sectors of West Virginia.

Social Studies Standard 4: Geography

SS.S.K.04 / Students will:

  • interpret and choose maps, globes and other geographic tools to categorize and organize information about personal directions, people, places, and environments (The World in Spatial Terms).
  • examine the physical and human characteristics of place and explain how the lives of people are rooted in places and regions (Places and Regions).
  • analyze the physical processes that shape the earthís surface and create, sustain and modify the cultural and natural environment (Physical Systems).
  • analyze and illustrate how the earth is shaped by the movement of people and their activities (Human Systems).
  • analyze the interaction of society with the environment (Environment and Society).
  • point out geographic perspective and tools and assess techniques available for geographic study (Uses of Geography).
  • SS.PD.WV.04 / Performance Descriptors
    • Novice—Students are able to:
      • know that West Virginia is divided into counties and each has a county seat, that there are bordering states, discuss selected items, and define exact and relative locations; and
      • know that there are four physical geographic regions, tell what the weather patterns are and identify the natural resource land physical geography
    • Partial Mastery—Students are able to:
      • name West Virginia counties and county seats, bordering states, and selected items and differentiate between the exact and relative location of each; and
      • name the four physical geographic regions, describe the weather patterns and explain the impact of natural resource location and physical geography.
    • Mastery—Students are able to:
      • locate West Virginia counties and county seats, bordering states, and selected items and differentiate between the exact and relative location of each; and
      • determine the four physical geographic regions, illustrate the weather patterns and analyze the impact of natural resource location and physical geography.
    • Above Mastery—Students are able to:
      • place West Virginia counties and county seats, bordering states, and selected items on a map and explain the importance of differentiating between the exact and relative location of each; and
      • debate the similarities and differences of the four physical geographic regions, explain the weather pattern changes and evaluate the impact of natural resource location and physical geography;
    • Distinguished—Students are able to:
      • create a map that illustrates relationships between West Virginia counties and the location of their county seats, bordering states, and selected items and create a description differentiating between the exact and relative location of each; and
      • summarize the four physical geographic regions, evaluate the importance of the weather patterns and analyze the relationship between the location of natural resources and physical geography, and evaluate their impact on the inhabitants.
  • Objectives / Students will:
    • SS.O.WV.04.01: locate West Virginia and bordering states on a United States map.
    • SS.O.WV.04.02: determine the four physical geographic regions of West Virginia and the major communities contained within each region.
    • SS.O.K.04.03: locate counties and county seats on a West Virginia map.
    • SS.O.K.04.04: analyze the impact of West Virginia’s geography on transportation, settlement, jobs, clothing, food, shelter, services and interaction with others outside the state.
    • SS.O.K.04.05: illustrate West Virginia’s climate and track the weather.
    • SS.O.K.04.06: compare and contrast the characteristics of renewable and nonrenewable resources.
    • SS.O.K.04.06: differentiate between the exact and relative locations of their state, town, county, and personal address.
    • SS.O.K.04.08: research West Virginia’s population, products, resources, transportation, state parks, forests, and scenic/recreational resources and draw conclusions from the information.
    • SS.O.WV.04.09: use a grid system to locate natural and man-made items on a map.
    • SS.O.WV.04.10: recognize the eight tourist regions of West Virginia.

Social Studies Standard 5: History

SS.S.WV.05 / Students will:

  • organize, analyze and compare historical events, distinguish cause-effect relationships, theorize alternative actions and outcomes, and anticipate future application (Chronology).
  • use the processes and resources of historical inquiry to develop appropriate questions, gather and examine evidence, compare, analyze and interpret historical data (Skills and Application).
  • examine, analyze and synthesize historical knowledge of major events, individuals, cultures and the humanities in West Virginia, the United States, and the world (Culture and Humanities).
  • use historical knowledge to analyze local, state, national and global interdependence (Interpretation and Evaluation).
  • examine political institutions and theories that have developed and changed over time; and research and cite reasons for development and change (Political Institutions).
  • SS.PD.WV.05 / Performance Descriptors
    • Novice—Students are able to:
      • give examples of past and present lifestyles of West Virginia;
      • list examples of economic, social, and political history of West Virginia; and
      • verbally give short answers to specific questions.
    • Partial Mastery—Students are able to:
      • describe lifestyles and cultural life of West Virginia reflected in folklore and heritage;
      • give examples of economic, social, and political history of West Virginia; and
      • write a paragraph or short answer to specific questions.
    • Mastery—Students are able to:
      • compare and contrast past and present lifestyles of West Virginia and describe the cultural life reflected in folklore and heritage;
      • reconstruct the economic, social, and political history of West Virginia; and
      • construct short reports to answer specific questions.
    • Above Mastery—Students are able to:
      • discriminate between past and present lifestyles giving reason for their differences and evaluate the folklore and heritage;
      • explain important events in economic, social, and political history of West Virginia; and
      • research topics of interest and write short summaries.
    • Distinguished—Students are able to:
      • summarize past and present lifestyles of West Virginia and relate the culture to folklore and heritage;
      • summarize changes in the economic, social, and political history of West Virginia; and
      • summarize and defend sources they use to write reports.
  • Objectives / Students will:
    • SS.O.WV.05.01: reconstruct the economic, social and political history of West Virginia.
    • SS.O.WV.05.02: research and describe the cultural life of West Virginia as reflected in folklore and heritage.
    • SS.O.K.05.03: compare and contrast past and present lifestyles of West Virginians.
    • SS.O.K.05.04: use reference sources to construct short reports that answer specific questions about West Virginia.
 
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