Teaching Materials
Ask a Master Teacher
Lesson Plan Gateway
Lesson Plan Reviews
State Standards
Teaching Guides
Digital Classroom
Ask a Digital Historian
Tech for Teachers
Beyond the Chalkboard
History Content
Ask a Historian
Beyond the Textbook
History Content Gateway
History in Multimedia
Museums and Historic Sites
National Resources
Quiz
Website Reviews
Issues and Research
Report on the State of History Education
Research Briefs
Roundtables
Best Practices
Examples of Historical Thinking
Teaching in Action
Teaching with Textbooks
Using Primary Sources
TAH Projects
Lessons Learned
Project Directors Conference
Project Spotlight
TAH Projects
About
Staff
Partners
Technical Working Group
Research Advisors
Teacher Representatives
Privacy
Quiz Rules
Blog
Outreach
Teaching History.org logo and contact info

West Virginia: 7th-Grade Standards

Seventh grade social studies examines geography through the six essential elements: The World in Spatial Terms, Places and Regions, Physical Systems, Human Systems, Environment and Society and Uses of Geography. Students will examine people, places and events of today and analyze the relationships between them (culture, history, environmental concerns, political and economic systems) and their impact on the future of our world. Students will use 21st century technology as well as critical thinking and problem-solving skills to construct and interpret maps, graphs, charts, spreadsheets and other data to evaluate and synthesize global information from a geographical perspective. The West Virginia Standards for 21st Century Learning include the following components: 21st Century Content Standards and Objectives and 21st Century Learning Skills and Technology Tools. All West Virginia teachers are responsible for classroom instruction that integrates learning skills, technology tools and content standards and objectives.

Social Studies Standard 1: Citizenship

SS.S.07.01 / Students will:

  • characterize and model good citizenship by building social networks of reciprocity and trustworthiness (Civic Dispositions).
  • model a respect for symbols, ideas and concepts of the United States and analyze the roles of significant individuals (Respect For People, Events, and Symbols).
  • develop and employ the civic skills necessary for effective citizenship by using criteria to make judgments, arrive at and defend positions and evaluate the validity of the positions or data (Evaluation Skills).
  • develop the participatory skills of interacting, monitoring and influencing that are essential for informed, effective and responsible citizenship, including participation in civic life to shape public policy (Participatory Skills).
  • recognize and communicate the responsibilities, privileges and rights of United States citizens (Civic Life).
  • SS.PD.07.1 / Performance Descriptors

    • Novice:
      • recognize the laws of nations and differentiate define power and authority.
      • recognize the rights, responsibilities of citizens in world regions.
      • identify citizen actions that influence public policy decisions.
      • participate in civic discussion consistent with the ideals of a democratic republic.
    • Partial Mastery:
      • identify the differences in the laws of nations laws and describe differences between power and authority.
      • identify the rights, responsibilities, and participation of citizens in world regions.
      • describe citizen actions that influence public policy decisions.
      • practice civic discussion consistent with the ideals of a democratic republic.
    • Mastery:
      • compare and contrast nations laws and differentiate between power and authority.
      • compare and contrast the rights, responsibilities, and participation of citizens in world regions.
      • research, organize and model citizen actions that influence public policy decisions.
      • apply and practice civic discussion consistent with the ideals of a democratic republic.
    • Above Mastery:
      • assess how laws of other nations are influence by American democratic ideals and how other nations influence American politics and society and distinguish between power and authority.
      • communicate how the rights, responsibilities, and participation of citizens in world regions relates to the American democratic system.
      • research, organize and model citizen actions that influence public policy decisions to develop a solution for a real world political issue.
      • actively participate in formulating civic discussions on a variety of topics consistent with the ideals of a democratic republic.
    • Distinguished:
      • research and draw conclusions of how other nationsí laws are influenced by American democratic ideals and prove the influence of other nations on American politics and society and distinguish between power and authority.
      • debate and defend how the rights, responsibilities, and participation of citizens in world regions relates to the American democratic system.
      • draw conclusions about citizen actions that influence public policy decisions and develop original solutions for real world political issues at all levels.
      • formulate and lead civic discussions on a variety of topics consistent with the ideals of a democratic republic that demonstrate good communication skills.
  • Objectives / Students will:

    • SS.O.07.01.01: compare and contrast individual rights of citizens in a variety of world regions.
    • SS.O.07.01.02: model the actions citizens take to influence public policy decisions.
    • SS.O.07.01.03: compare and contrast nationsí laws that may or may not provide order, predictability and security.
    • SS.O.07.01.04: research and organize information about an issue of public concern from multiple points of view.
    • SS.O.07.01.05: apply and practice selective forms of civic discussion and participation consistent with the ideas of citizens in a democratic republic.
    • SS.O.07.01.06: recognize and differentiate between power and authority.

Social Studies Standard 2: Civics

SS.S.07.02 / Students will:

  • examine and analyze the purposes and basic principles of the United States government (Purposes of Government).
  • outline and evaluate and analyze the origins and meaning of the principles, ideals and core democratic values expressed in the foundational documents of the United States (Ideals of United States Democracy).
  • examine and distinguish the structure, function and responsibilities of governments and the allocation of power at the local, state and national levels (United States Government and Politics).
  • analyze how the world is organized politically and compare the role and relationship of the United States to other nations and to world affairs (United States Government and World Affairs).
  • SS.PD.07.2 / Performance Descriptors

    • Novice:
      • define different forms of government and different lawmaking processes.
      • recognize limited government and rule of law.
      • list ways nations interact with one another to solve problems.
      • give an example of the influence of the United States on other nations and an example of how other nations influence the United States.
      • list ways nations interact with one another to resolve problems and conflict.
    • Partial Mastery:
      • identify differences in forms of government and compare and contrast their lawmaking processes.
      • identify limited government and rule of law.
      • explain the ways nations provide order and protect justice.
      • describe the influence the United States has on other nations and how other nations influence the American political process and society.
      • describe the ways nations interact with one another to resolve problems and conflict.
    • Mastery:
      • examine differences in forms of government and compare and contrast their lawmaking processes.
      • debate the need for limited government and rule of law.
      • analyze the ways nations provide order and protect justice.
      • recognize and evaluate the influence the United States has on other nations and how other nations influence the American political process and society.
      • evaluate the methods nations use to interact with one another to resolve problems and conflict.
    • Above Mastery:
      • compare and contrast different forms of government and analyze their lawmaking processes to make comparisons.
      • debate the need for limited government and rule of law providing examples and evidence.
      • compare and contrast the ways nations provide order and protect justice through analysis of current topics.
      • summarize and discuss the influence the U.S. has on other nations and how other nations influence the U.S. political process and society.
      • apply the methods nations use to interact with one another to resolve problems and conflict.
    • Distinguished:
      • analyze different forms of government to make comparisons and draw conclusions about the effectiveness of lawmaking processes.
      • communicate effectively to argue the need for limited government and rule of law providing extensive examples and evidence.
      • analyze the ways nations provide order and protect justice through analysis of current topics and evaluate for effectiveness.
      • argue and compare the significance of the impact of U.S. influence on other nations and the influence of other nations on the U.S. political process and society.
      • apply the methods nations use to interact with one another to develop a solution to a real world issue of conflict.
  • Objectives / Students will:

    • SS.O.07.02.01: examine the different forms of government in various world regions.
    • SS.O.07.02.02: compare and contrast the lawmaking processes of world governments.
    • SS.O.07.02.03: analyze the different ways nations provide order and protect justice.
    • SS.O.07.02.04: debate the importance of limited government and the rule of law.
    • SS.O.07.02.05: evaluate various methods that nations use to interact with one another to resolve problems and conflicts.
    • SS.O.07.02.06: recognize and evaluate the influence of the United States on other nations and the influence of other nations on the American political process and society.

Social Studies Standard 3: Economics

SS.S.07.03 / Students will:

  • analyze the role of economic choices in scarcity, supply and demand, resource allocation, decision-making, voluntary exchange and trade-offs (Choices).
  • research, critique and evaluate the roles of private and public institutions in the economy (Institutions).
  • compare and contrast various economic systems and analyze their impact on individual citizens (Economic Systems).
  • illustrate how the factors of production impact the United States economic system (Factors of Production).
  • analyze the elements of competition and how they impact the economy (Competition).
  • examine and evaluate the interdependence of global economies (Global Economies).
  • SS.PD.07.3 / Performance Descriptors

    • Novice:
      • recognize that there are different economic systems and list some of the social services provided by governments using these systems;
      • define the terms supply, demand, price and recognize competition.
      • recall what the physical / human geography and technology influences are that affect economic, agricultural and industrial development.
    • Partial Mastery:
      • describe characteristics of economic systems, explain their interdependence, and identify social services provided by governments with these systems;
      • explain the connection between supply, demand and competition.
      • identify and describe the physical / human geography and technology that influences economic, agricultural and industrial development.
    • Mastery:
      • compare and contrast economic systems, explain their interdependence and the various social services provided by governments with these systems;
      • illustrate the relationship between supply, demand and price and examine their impact of competition.
      • analyze how physical /human geography and technology impacts worldwide economic, agricultural and industrial development.
    • Above Mastery:
      • analyze economic systems, explain the significance of their interdependence, and evaluate the various social services provided by different governments with these systems;
      • analyze the relationship between supply, demand and price and research the impact of these factors on competition.
      • evaluate how physical and human geography and technology impacts worldwide economic, agricultural and industrial development.
    • Distinguished:
      • critique economic systems, interpret the impact of interdependence on world economics, evaluate the social services provided by different governments and debate their effectiveness;
      • research the impact of competition to develop an economic plan for the future that shows relationships between supply, demand and price.
      • predict how physical/ human geography as well as future technological developments will impact worldwide economic, agricultural and industrial development.
  • Objectives / Students will:

    • SS.O.07.03.01: examine how competition among buyers of a product results in higher prices, and illustrate the relationship between supply, demand and the price of that product.
    • SS.O.07.03.02: analyze the physical and human geographic factors that influence the economy of a region.
    • SS.O.07.03.03: define basic economic terminology and apply it to economic development of world regions.
    • SS.O.07.03.04: compare and contrast various social services provided by world governments.
    • SS.O.07.03.05: classify and compare different types of economic systems.
    • SS.O.07.03.06: describe the impact of technology on agriculture and industry throughout the world.
    • SS.O.07.03.07: classify and evaluate the different types of world trade organizations (e.g., trade, military, health).
    • SS.O.07.03.08: assess the impact of natural and human events on industry worldwide (e.g., strikes, environmental disasters, war, terrorism).
    • SS.O.07.03.09: formulate an explanation as to how countries are economically interdependent.

Social Studies Standard 4: Geography

SS.S.07.04 / Students will:

  • interpret, and choose maps, globes and other geographic tools to categorize and organize information about personal directions, people, places and environments (The World in Spatial Terms).
  • examine the physical and human characteristics of place and explain how the lives of people are rooted in places and regions (Places and Regions).
  • analyze the physical processes that shape the earthís surface and create, sustain and modify the cultural and natural environment (Physical Systems).
  • analyze and illustrate how the earth is shaped by the movement of people and their activities (Human Systems).
  • analyze the interaction of society with the environment (Environment and Society).
  • point out geographic perspective and the tools and assess techniques available for geographic study (Uses of Geography).
  • SS.PD.07.4 / Performance Descriptors

    • Novice:
      • identify spatial data and define appropriate geographic terminology to find information.
      • locate the geographic regions and cultures of the world and define the physical and human processes that shape their environments.
      • name ways technology, communication and transportation affect the global society.
    • Partial Mastery:
      • use spatial data and appropriate geographic terminology and tools to find and describe information.
      • identify the geographic regions and cultures of the world and define how the physical and human processes interact to shape their environments.
      • identify the effects of technology, communication and transportation on the global society.
    • Mastery:
      • analyze spatial data to identify and locate relevant information to draw conclusions about geographic regions.
      • describe the geographic regions and cultures of the world and how the physical and human processes interact to shape their environments.
      • analyze the effects of technology, communication and transportation on the global society.
    • Above Mastery:
      • use spatial data, precise geographic terminology and best tools to draw conclusions about the future of geographic regions.
      • compare world geographic regions and explain the connections between cultural development and physical/ human processes that shape their environments.
      • draw conclusions about the effects of technology, communication and transportation on the global society.
    • Distinguished:
      • create accurate and relevant spatial data displays to predict the impact of future interactions between geographic regions.
      • research the cultures of the world in select geographic regions and summarize how the physical and human processes interact to shape their environments.
      • predict the effects of innovations in technology, communication and transportation on the global society.
  • Objectives / Students will:

    • SS.O.07.04.01: use correct geographic terminology to explain direction, location, time zones, physical features of the earth.
    • SS.O.07.04.02: draw conclusions about information presented on special purpose maps and be able to differentiate among map types.
    • SS.O.07.04.03: Identify and locate on a variety of maps and give examples of the following:
      • seven continents
      • bodies of water
      • landforms
      • countries
      • cities
      • climate regions
      • transportation routes
    • SS.O.07.04.04: describe and explain the advantages and disadvantages of different map projections and show examples of their uses (e.g., aerial photos, globes, charts, graphs, polar projection).
    • SS.O.07.04.05: evaluate the importance of mental maps (perceptions) and illustrate how they affect our judgments about people and places.
    • SS.O.07.04.06: analyze the patterns of immigration and examine its effects on the distribution of cultural patterns in a region (e.g., disease, language, religion, customs, diversity).
    • SS.O.07.04.07: analyze the growth of tourism and its impact on regional environments and culture.
    • SS.O.07.04.08: analyze and give examples of the ways in which these factors influence lifestyles and regional interconnections:
      • economic
      • geographic
      • cultural
      • religious
      • political
      • social
    • SS.O.07.04.09: evaluate the impact of human processes on the worldís physical environment (e.g., pollution, clear-cutting, strip mining).
    • SS.O.07.04.10: analyze the use and abuse of renewable and nonrenewable resources (e.g., hydroelectric power and fossil fuels), interpret how technology affects the ways in which culture groups perceive and use their resources, and give examples of ways to improve conservation of natural resources around the world.
    • SS.O.07.04.11: analyze the technological improvements in transportation and communication that have helped create a global society.
    • SS.O.07.04.12: explain the common geographic factors associated with the development of world urban centers.
    • SS.O.07.04.13: examine cooperation and conflict over control of the worldís resources.
    • SS.O.07.04.14: create population pyramids to show comparisons of the characteristics of demographic structure in selected regions of the world (e.g., total size, birth rates, age, distribution, doubling time).
    • SS.O.07.04.15: explain culture in a geographic context (e.g., isolation, core area, movement).
    • SS.O.07.04.16: investigate and research new geographic frontiers such as the oceans, Antarctica and airspace and describe explorations and discoveries in these realms.

Social Studies Standard 5: History

SS.S.07.05 / Students will:

  • organize, analyze and compare historical events, distinguish cause-effect relationships, theorize alternative actions and outcomes, and anticipate future application (Chronology).
  • use the processes and resources of historical inquiry to develop appropriate questions, gather and examine evidence, compare, analyze and interpret historical data (Skills and Application).
  • examine, analyze and synthesize historical knowledge of major events, individuals, cultures and the humanities in West Virginia, the United States and the world (Culture and Humanities).
  • use historical knowledge to analyze local, state, national and global interdependence (Interpretation and Evaluation).
  • examine political institutions and theories that have developed and changed over time; and research and cite reasons for development and change (Political Institutions).
  • SS.PD.07.5 / Performance Descriptors

    • Novice:
      • match significant people, places, documents, ideas and events with the correct periods and contexts of early civilization.
      • list effects of migration on religions, governments, societies and past and present cultures
      • identify cultural assimilation and describe how it effects political and social situations and decisions.
    • Partial Mastery:
      • list and label the significant people, places, documents, ideas and events in their correct periods and contexts of early civilization.
      • give examples of the effects of migration on religions, governments, societies and past and present cultures.
      • recognize the long-lasting effects of cultural assimilation on political and social situations and decisions.
    • Mastery:
      • identify significant people, places, documents, ideas and events and place them into the correct periods and contexts of early civilization.
      • trace and describe the effects of migration on religions, governments, societies and past and present cultures.
      • examine and explain the long-lasting effects of cultural assimilation on political and social situations and decisions.
    • Above Mastery:
      • explain the significance of people, places, documents, ideas and events within their correct periods and contexts of early civilization.
      • analyze and discuss the effects of migration on religions, governments, societies and past and present cultures.
      • analyze the long-lasting effects of cultural assimilation on political and social situations and decisions.
      • argue the importance of industry, labor, transportation and technology issues, and discuss the ramifications of these challenges.
    • Distinguished:
      • judge it the significance of the contributions of people, places, documents, ideas and events in their correct period and context would be the same if they occurred in other periods and contexts.
      • evaluate and summarize the effects of migration on religions, governments, societies and past and present cultures.
      • summarize and debate the long-lasting effects of cultural assimilation on political and social situations and decisions.
  • Objectives / Students will:

    • SS.O.07.05.01: analyze the development of early civilizations (e.g., Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, China, India).
    • SS.O.07.05.02: draw world history conclusions from maps, globes, charts, posters, graphs and timelines.
    • SS.O.07.05.03: characterize conditions that have influenced or altered the movement of people throughout the world and time.
    • SS.O.07.05.04: examine and chart religious and secular celebrations observed around the world.
    • SS.O.07.05.05: research and explain the role of racial and ethnic minorities, women and children in the advancement of civil rights.
    • SS.O.07.05.06: compare and contrast the beliefs, religion and mythology of native cultures throughout the world.
    • SS.O.07.05.07: anticipate what occurs when people from different regions interact.
    • SS.O.07.05.08: interpret the effect of the environment on native cultures (e.g., Native Americans, Australian Aborigines, African Berbers).
    • SS.O.07.05.09: use a variety of credible sources to research, reconstruct and interpret the past.
    • SS.O.07.05.10: describe the role geo-politics played in historic events.

Social Studies Standard 6: Reading

SS.S.07.06 / Students will:

  • use the dimensions of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics, background knowledge/vocabulary, high frequency word/fluency, comprehension, and writing) in their acquisition of social studies knowledge, insuring a foundation of college readiness in this genre.
  • recognize main ideas and supporting details to locate basic facts (e.g. names, dates, events).
  • distinguish relationships among people, ideas, and events.
  • recognize cause-effect relationships in content passages.
  • outline sequences of events.
  • summarize events and ideas. Infer main idea or purpose of content.
  • draw generalizations and conclusions about people, ideas and events.
  • write and edit organized texts of various genres to insure that information is clearly understood.

(Refer to policy 2520.1 for specific grade level reading and writing objectives.)

 
Content