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Classroom Glory

May 9 2010
Instructions

Film’s dynamic narratives and living characters draw students in—but are they useful teaching tools? The film, "Glory," frequently shown in classrooms, tells the story of the 54th Massachusetts, a famous African American regiment in the Civil War. Decide whether the following “truths” suggested by the film are true or false.

  1. The 54th Massachusetts regiment led by Robert Gould Shaw, son of prominent (white) abolitionists, consisted largely of former slaves.

    True

    False

  2. The unsuccessful but heroic attack on Fort Wagner, SC, in which the Confederates killed or captured approximately 50% of the regiment, was the last battle in which the 54th served.

    True

    False

  3. The bravery of the 54th at Fort Wagner inspired Congress to authorize raising other African American troops for the Union army.

    True

    False

  4. A member of the regiment was flogged for desertion, in keeping with standard military punishments at the time.

    True

    False