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The Royal We: Princesses of the Past

Dec 13 2009
Instructions

The U.S. formed by breaking ties with a king, but its people remain fascinated by royalty—particularly glamorous queens and princesses, whether fictional or real. While we have no royalty of our own, monarchies (and princesses) do figure in American history. Choose whether the following statements are true or false.

  1. When Pocahontas, daughter of Algonquian chief Powhatan, met King James I in England, he chided her husband, colonist John Rolfe, for having dared to marry a royal.

    True

    False

  2. Queen Lili’uokalani, forced to abdicate her throne in 1893, was the last female royal of the Hawaiian monarchy.

    True

    False

  3. One female sachem (an Algonquian tribal chief) took part in the bloody 1675-1676 conflict between New England colonists and Native Americans known as King Philip’s War.

    True

    False

  4. The marriage of Japanese imperial princess Kazunomiya to the acting ruler of Japan, shogun Tokugawa Iemochi, was a direct reaction to the 1854 Convention of Kanagawa, in which American Commodore Matthew C. Perry intimidated Japan into opening its ports to the U.S.

    True

    False