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Remembering All Veterans

Nov 8 2010
Instructions

From the Revolution onwards, racial and ethnic minorities have fought for the U.S. as soldiers, even in the face of unequal treatment as civilians. During World War II, Japanese Americans served as soldiers while at home their families were forced into internment camps. Answer these questions on the national memorial to Japanese Americans in World War II.


  1. The National Japanese American Memorial To Patriotism During World War II (the memorial's full name) was completed in:
    A.

    1953

    B.

    1960

    C.

    1988

    D.

    2001


  2. More than 800 names are engraved on the low wall surrounding the DC memorial. These are the names of:
    A.

    Japanese Americans interned in the camps.

    B.

    U.S. citizens imprisoned for protesting internment.

    C.

    Japanese Americans who died in service during the war.

    D.

    U.S. citizens who funded the monument.


  3. Five stone "islands" dot the pool on one side of the memorial. These represent not only the four main islands of Japan, but also:
    A.

    Five major Pacific battles in which Japanese Americans fought.

    B.

    Five basic human rights.

    C.

    Five generations of Japanese Americans.

    D.

    Five court battles leading to reparations.


  4. The central statue of the memorial depicts:
    A.

    Two cranes entwined with barbed wire.

    B.

    Japanese American children standing behind a fence.

    C.

    Three Japanese American service people in uniform.

    D.

    Fred Korematsu, who resisted internment and whose case went to the Supreme Court.