Welcome to Teaching Materials

Setting the Tone: Introducing Students to World War II
In Ask a Master Teacher
World Digital Library
In English Language Learners
Using Visuals to Build Interest and Understanding
In English Language Learners

Spotlight on Elementary Education

History is made by those who are unafraid to push the envelope and redefine the society in which they live. Encourage your students to examine the men and women who worked to make America what it is today with this creative activity. FIND OUT MORE »

Lesson Plan Reviews

Evaluate key elements of effective teaching Watch the INTRODUCTORY VIDEO
Watergate and the Constitution

To indict or not to indict? Watergate raised complicated questions [...] »

My Piece of History

Even the recent past was very different from the present. Students analyze [...] »

English Language Learners

Instructional strategies and resources for ELL
Responding to English Learners’ Writing with the 3 P’s
Middle school student, VA

Use the three P’s (Preparation, Purpose, and Proficiency) to provide [...] »

The Struggle for Time: Using Persuasive Essays to Teach Elementary History

From chanting to formal essay framing—discover creative ways to frame ELL [...] »

Teaching Guides

Explore new teaching methods and approaches
Tramping Through History: Crafting Individual Field Trips

Go forth, and contextualize! Give students the opportunity for solo [...] »

Well-behaved Women [and Men] Seldom Make History

Help your elementary school students get more out of historical biographies [...] »

Concept Formation

In order to understand topics, you must first understand concepts. Learn all [...] »

Webquest, Inquiry, and Lincoln’s Views on Technology

Searching for new, exciting ways to engage your students in the classroom? [...] »

Internationalizing History

Discover the resources you need to "globalize" your U.S. history lesson [...] »

Ask a Master Teacher

Writing Critiques of Primary and Secondary Sources
Photography, And what other pictures say, 191--, Percy Loomis Sperr, NYPL

Unsure how to properly critique sources? Check out these guidelines.


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